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British Prisons Help Addicts Relapse Before Re-Entering Society 44

Posted by samzenpus
from the back-on-the-horse dept.
A new government "retoxification" program is helping formerly drug-addicted inmates get hooked back on drugs before being released to help avoid accidental overdoses. From the article: "Thirty-three prisons across England offer highly addictive heroin substitutes like methadone to inmates, even if their sentences mean they are effectively drug-free at the time of their release. Supporters claim it gets former addicts' bodies used to drugs again by building up tolerance and slashing the risk of overdose deaths. Critics blast it as 'state-sponsored' drug dealing." I'm surprised they don't give robbers a complimentary get-away car upon release to help alleviate future auto thefts.

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British Prisons Help Addicts Relapse Before Re-Entering Society

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  • by Upaut (670171)
    It was better when any addict could get a prescription for the drug itself, at an insanely low cost. You can be "very" functional on opiates, so long as you keep it up. Now that was state sponsored drug dealing.... Low, pure heroin with a prescription if you are an addict; and to be an addict you just had to tell your doctor you were.

    Violent drug dealers could not compete, and went to other organized crimes. Crime rate was much lower because the addicts could afford their fixes, and a failed drug test coul
    • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

      by Locke2005 (849178)
      and a failed drug test could be said "I have a prescription" and keep their job.

      that no longer works. [newsvine.com]
  • by oldspewey (1303305) on Wednesday April 07, 2010 @06:22PM (#31768402)

    I'm having difficulty understanding where the following process requires intervention or is not already fully optimized:

    1) Inmate kicks his/her addiction after a lengthy prison sentence
    2) Drug-free inmate is released for re-integration into society
    3) Former inmate chooses to begin using again, despite the fact he/she kicked the habit months or years ago
    4) Former inmate dies from an overdose
    5) "Last chance" used up. Former inmate will never trouble anyone again

    • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

      by Locke2005 (849178)
      Every premature loss of life is a tragedy; I believe Edgar Allen Poe and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle were both drug addicts at one point. That being said, I personally do not believe the government has the right or the responsibility to protect people from themselves.
      • by Nutria (679911) on Friday April 09, 2010 @11:17AM (#31789816)

        Every premature loss of life is a tragedy

        I'm getting nauseated just reading this brainless drivel.

        There are a lot of people for whom death before their statistically-expected lifespan is a benefit to society.

        Anyway, the word tragedy used to have an emotional impact, but now it's tossed around like candy, losing all meaning.

        • by Valdrax (32670)

          There are a lot of people for whom death before their statistically-expected lifespan is a benefit to society.

          Not everyone is a utilitarian who views the lives of others entirely in terms of their use to society, and it's not "brainless drivel" to place a different value on human life than the one you advocate, where relapsing into an addiction is worth a tacit death penalty.

          • by Nutria (679911)

            Not everyone is a utilitarian who views the lives of others entirely in terms of their use to society, and it's not "brainless drivel" to place a different value on human life than the one you advocate,

            Your field of view is way too narrow, assuming just because I assert that "There are a lot of people for whom death ... blah blah..." that I must be utilitarian.

            Amazingly, there's grey between "We Are The World" and strict utilitarianism.

      • would agree that, as addicts, their lives were degenerate. and that whatever they wrote is in spite of their drug use that was destroying their ability to write

        drug use easily leads to addiction. addiction hollows out a formerly delightful human being into a monomanical zombie: "fix, fix, fix, fix..." then they usually wind up being unable to hold a job or have a relationship. then myself, society, we have to house and feed these drug addicts

        since we are taking care of them, that therefore gives us every ri

    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'm having difficulty understanding where the following process requires intervention or is not already fully optimized:

      1) Inmate kicks his/her addiction after a lengthy prison sentence

      2) Drug-free inmate is released for re-integration into society

      3) Former inmate chooses to begin using again, despite the fact he/she kicked the habit months or years ago

      4) Former inmate dies from an overdose

      5) "Last chance" used up. Former inmate will never trouble anyone again

      The process is fully optimized and is the correct one. The key lies in step 3: "Former inmate chooses to begin using again, despite the fact he/she kicked the habit months or years ago". People make their own choices and sometimes these choices have consequences, in this case they know the risk they face and they willingly choose to use anyway. It is a tragedy but this person was already given help in kicking the habit via the prison sentence and had the opportunity to remain clean, that was one of their

    • you misunderstand addiction, just because you have beat an addiction doesn't mean you don't want to indulge it again.

      I am cigarette free 9 months and although i choose not to smoke i really would enjoy one.

      Opiates are really nice , very mellow and relaxing makes it easy to be close to dying without panicking. To be honest i'd choose to die full of morphine, it really is that good.

      • So not the point he was trying to make there. The issue I believe he was trying to get at goes something like this:
        IF this person was in jail AND this person was addicted to heroin THEN the heroin use is probably involved in why this person is in jail, so IF the person uses heroin again THEN they'll likely end up in jail again, so IF they die because they overdose THEN it's no great loss to society cuz they were just going back to jail anyways.
    • The unqualified level of ignorance in this post and the fact that others have ranked it insightful are a sad indictment of some of the slash dot community. Not to mention the fact that the source of the "story" is the Sun Newspaper - a source more normally the recipient of slashdot vitriol. Apparently any consistent moral standard of behaviour is to be abandoned the moment an opportunity to talk with a mouthful of ash presents itself.
      • 1 Citizen is sent to prison for crimes committed under the influence
    • Sure the addict is dead and will never again burgle my house to pay for his fix, but what happens to his poor children? They will will grow up with no father.
      And they might better off for it. Heh.
      Baiting liberals is fun.

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