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Pope Promotes Christian Netiquette 218

Posted by samzenpus
from the divine-friend-request dept.
angry tapir writes "Pope Benedict XVI Monday gave his blessing to social networking, urging Catholic Internet users to adopt a respectful Christian netiquette when spreading the Gospel online. The pope said new technologies were creating unprecedented opportunities for establishing relationships and building fellowship but warned against creating false online profiles out of vanity or diluting the Christian message to achieve popularity."

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Pope Promotes Christian Netiquette

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  • Today's theme is "Messages that should have been made 20 years ago."

    • by PRMan (959735)
      Hey, it's the Catholic Church. It took them 1000 years to recognize Orthodoxy, hundreds of years to recognize Protestants, etc. It only took 20 years for them to discover the internet. Leave them alone, they're doing well.
  • by Nethemas the Great (909900) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @12:44PM (#34995624)
    where on earth they found a picture of a nun with an Eee PC.
    • by Ancantus (1926920)

      where on earth they found a picture of a nun with an Eee PC.

      Photoshop is a wonderful thing.

      • Don't let the 500 year old fashion fool you. Most Priests, Nuns, Monks. Are well versed in todays technologies, as much as the rest of the population of their age is. In many ways these people have keener minds as they get older then the rest of the population. As religious life has many of the rigors of academic life. Keeping their minds fresh and continuously learning.

    • The Catholic Church is not against modern technology. Quite the opposite. It usually takes them a while to adopt them officially and use them (Vatican TV first aired in 1983 or something), but that doesn't mean that they consider it the "work of the devil" or similar bull.

      I don't remember any recent case where the RCC condemned any technology (that didn't directly touch one of their doctrines like the Pill) for the sake of being technology. You might notice that a lot of RCC personnel is actually quite fami

  • by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland @ y a hoo.com> on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @12:51PM (#34995766) Homepage Journal

    Catholic Church, but this make me happy.

    Religion would bother me a lot less if the people practicing it were polite.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Nadaka (224565)

      It varies with denomination, but many of them are either encouraged or even not allowed to be polite.

      They get brownie points for being able to perceive themselves as a repressed minority due to their faith, easiest way to do this is to behave outrageously and get flak for it.

      They may be required to convert the heathens on punishment of damnation for failing to spread the word.

      etc.

      On the other hand, I know a few genuinely nice religious people with a good sense of humor, but they seem to be in the minority.

    • by vadim_t (324782)

      Me too. I like the rule against dilution as well, actually.

      Picking the nice and fluffy bits out of the Bible makes it all sound much better than it is when you pay attention to the entire thing.

      Atheists should definitely welcome it. Lots of people lose their belief when they read the Bible from cover to cover and find out that there's quite a bit of nasty stuff in there.

    • Agreed. Take Quakers, please! They has profound civility. But this humility is a double-edged sword... Bombard your average Quaker with gamma rays and you get... something... dangerous...

      Smedley Darlington Butler smash!

  • Praying (Score:5, Funny)

    by gfreeman (456642) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @12:53PM (#34995816)

    "It is important always to remember that virtual contact cannot and must not take the place of direct human contact with people at every level of our lives."

    Said the pope, just before praying to god

    • Why did my mod points expire yesterday? This was the funniest thing I've read on /. in a while!

    • "It is important always to remember that virtual contact cannot and must not take the place of direct human contact with people at every level of our lives."

      Said the pope, just before praying to god

      I see what you did there, but...it kind of misses the point.

      Sure, you can draw an analogy between prayer and "virtual contact", but the Pope isn't condemning virtual contact, he is stating that it is important that it not take the place of "direct human contact with people at every level of our lives". I think you will find that, generally, the Pope and the Church, while obviously supporting prayer, don't advocate it displacing "direct human contact with people at every level of our lives". So, even seeing

      • by gfreeman (456642)

        I beg to differ. Praying to god is a replacement for direct human contact.

        Want something done? Do it yourself, with help from other real live human beings ... or pray to god.

        Want to be thankful? Thank those real live people who made what you are thankful for ... or pray to god.

        It misses no point at all. While you are busy being with virtual god, you could be interacting with real live human beings.

        Prayer is less influential than Facebook.

  • by david.emery (127135) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @12:59PM (#34995920)

    Thou shalt friend thy neighbor as thyself

    • by al0ha (1262684)
      Good show, wish I had mod points for you.
    • by geekoid (135745)

      When friending they neighbors wife, thy neighbors wife shall be stoned, or whipped, or hanged.
      And when they Neighbors wife shill poke you, you will shun they neighbors wife and tell the elders so thy community will cast her out.

  • I wonder if the eventual recommendations will include something saying that top posting [netmanners.com] is bad. If so then the pope will go up in my estimation.

    Trimming of multiple copies of old signatures would be good as well! I suppose that avoiding HTML email would be too much to ask for.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      top posting is logical, productive, and practical.

      Bottom posting is stupid, confusing, and not practical.

    • by jittles (1613415)
      There are times when top posting is appropriate and times when it is not. If you're going to reply to things inside the body of the sender's email then it is of the utmost importance to make it easy to distinguish between the original message and the reply. A lot of people on mailing lists fail miserably at that and it makes it difficult to read their response.
      • by sjames (1099)

        I really hate when I see a long email on a list and either have to hit page down 10 times to find the first bit that I didn't just read in the last 5 messages or when I get to the bottom 30 pages later and still haven't found anything new. It might be there and it might not, who knows?

  • ...did he say if you should wear a condom while using the internet?

    People want to know!!!

  • Really, does anyone think there would be any serious commentary under this story? On Slashdot?
  • by PrimaryConsult (1546585) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @02:17PM (#34997238)

    The pope said there was "a Christian way of being present in the digital world: this takes the form of a communication which is honest and open, responsible and respectful of others."

    If people would actually follow this it would increase the quality of the discourse on the internet. Regardless of what you think of the religion, this is a good thing.

    And why must every Catholic article get the same tired pedophile priest jokes? There's no more pedophile priests than there are pedophile psychiatrists, teachers, and scout masters out there.

    • > There's no more pedophile priests than there are
      > pedophile psychiatrists, teachers, and scout masters

      cite, please.

      The commonly-held belief is that the priesthood attracts self-loathing homosexuals and/or pedophiles at a higher rate than other professions. These people then try to use priesthood celibacy to repress their sexuality, and eventually they simply "burst".

      • > There's no more pedophile priests than there are
        > pedophile psychiatrists, teachers, and scout masters

        cite, please.

        Here's one for starters [newsweek.com].

        The commonly-held belief is that the priesthood attracts self-loathing homosexuals and/or pedophiles at a higher rate than other professions.

        Please point to any evidence for the effect this "commonly-held" belief explains (to wit, the supposedly greater incidence of abuse in the Catholic Church). You don't even need to support the explanation offered by the belief, just the thing it seeks to explain.

  • And this is why /. shouldn't post anything on religion. The readers of /. may know a lot about technology, but the people who post, don't know the first thing about religion and only post comments based off pop-culture and don't actually do their own research.
  • by GodfatherofSoul (174979) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @03:54PM (#34998536)

    I think these will eventually evolve, but I'd like to see *more* organized pushes to set some standards. I've been a net denizen since around '91 and many of the issues I see people struggling with (or at least not appreciating the consequences of) I've already been through. Things like firing off that quick, snide comment, the persistence of any statements you make, privacy, etc. I'm by no means perfect or Lawful Good on the interwebz, but I at least understand what can happen every time I interact online.

The world is moving so fast these days that the man who says it can't be done is generally interrupted by someone doing it. -- E. Hubbard

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