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William Shatner Wakes Up Crew for Final Discovery Mission 185

Posted by samzenpus
from the discovery-cancelled dept.
The Space Shuttle Discovery left the International Space Station this morning for the last time. To commemorate the ship's accomplishments over 27 years of service, the crew was greeted to a morning wake-up message from Capt. Kirk. "Space, the final frontier," Shatner said in a prerecorded message. "These have been the voyages of the space shuttle Discovery. Her 30-year mission: to seek out new science, to build new outposts, to bring nations together on the final frontier, to boldly go and do what no spacecraft has done before."

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William Shatner Wakes Up Crew for Final Discovery Mission

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  • WoW (Score:3, Insightful)

    by dakkon1024 (691790) on Monday March 07, 2011 @02:59PM (#35409100)
    This is nerdy, even by my standards.
    • Re:WoW (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Higaran (835598) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:06PM (#35409216)
      Yes, but it's still awesome on soo many levels.
      • by Shivetya (243324) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:21PM (#35409488) Homepage Journal

        and it was simply awesome. Obviously anyone listening to most news radio shows on their drive will have heard it. I wonder how much the current generation connects to those words? I know that some will equate it with Star Trek but I wonder how many have seen it. I was further amazed at how much his voice did not seem to have changed.

      • Re:WoW (Score:4, Interesting)

        by vxice (1690200) on Monday March 07, 2011 @04:11PM (#35410232)
        "Shatner said in a prerecorded message." Historic event, he almost considered waking up for it.
        • Re:WoW (Score:5, Funny)

          by discord5 (798235) on Monday March 07, 2011 @06:05PM (#35411936)

          "Shatner said in a prerecorded message." Historic event, he almost considered waking up for it.

          They tried doing a live version, but gave up and simply cut out all the pauses between the words. They were also afraid that Ricardo Montalban would show up in the middle of the introduction. Instead of a wakeup call with some memorable words, there'd be a scream so powerful that it would be capable of making sound in a vacuum. "KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!". I mean, imagine waking up to that.

          So NASA kinda looked at all the pros and cons, and decided that the best option was simply not to invite Shatner personally. He's been known to be a bit of a prick at times too, so that's why people don't invite him to the cool parties anymore either. That, and that horrible toupee. Does he still wear the toupee?

        • by syousef (465911)

          "Shatner said in a prerecorded message." Historic event, he almost considered waking up for it.

          Well, what do you expect. He's an old man now! It should be !@#$ my GRANDad says.

      • There are two geeks sitting here who are trying to work out whether to cry, giggle, or giggle till they cry. This is the whole point of (good, hard) science fiction....to predict things so well that there's no real option but to go out and do it for real. Good on Discovery, good on Shatner, good on Roddenberry and good on humanity in general.

        Yes, we were promised jetpacks back in the 70s, but this is nearly as good, and frankly, has a whole lot more charm. I love this stuff.
    • Re:WoW (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Sonny Yatsen (603655) * on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:26PM (#35409572) Journal

      But, it's so appropriate. Ask a lot of the Astronauts and Engineers at NASA what inspired them as children to work for NASA and in space and you will get a pretty good percentage of people citing how they, as kids, sat around a tiny television set in the late 60s or early 70s watching Captain Kirk, Dr. McCoy and Mr. Spock explore the galaxy.

      I can't think of a better or more appropriate way to send off the Discovery as it goes home. (There is a little bit of me in the back of my head that wished that the Space Shuttle Enterprise made it to space - then Shatner's sendoff would be even more appropriate.)

    • by blair1q (305137)

      Being geeked by this is an indicator of one's nerdiness. I wonder what the non-American crew thought of it.

      • by gstoddart (321705)

        Being geeked by this is an indicator of one's nerdiness. I wonder what the non-American crew thought of it.

        At this point, I'm betting even the non-American crew is aware of Star Trek.

        It's been around for almost 45 years at this point.

        • by blair1q (305137)

          So has anime, but if I'm on the ISS and the theme from Astro Boy comes out of the speakers, I'm unlikely to recognize its cultural significance.

          • by gstoddart (321705)

            So has anime, but if I'm on the ISS and the theme from Astro Boy comes out of the speakers, I'm unlikely to recognize its cultural significance.

            Great, now I've got that song stuck in my head ... "he is brave, and mighty, and wise ...".

            • by blair1q (305137)

              To make up for it I shall hum the theme from underdog while I walk to the bathroom.

          • Re:WoW (Score:4, Insightful)

            by isorox (205688) on Monday March 07, 2011 @04:33PM (#35410570) Homepage Journal

            So has anime, but if I'm on the ISS and the theme from Astro Boy comes out of the speakers, I'm unlikely to recognize its cultural significance.

            That's because is has no cultural significance beyond a few nerdy fanboys. Star Trek is a massive, multinational, franchise. The last film brought in $125 million internationally, and indeed it was shown on the space station when it came out. Kirk and Spock are internationally known by anyone with the slightest interest in space.

    • by antdude (79039)

      Too much World of Warcraft (WoW) for you. :)

    • by AbRASiON (589899) *

      No, what's nerdy is you wrote it as "WoW" not "Wow" or "WOW" but "WoW" which sadly in my eyes reads as World of Warcraft (and I don't even play the damned game)
      That's nerdy.

  • Damnit Jim (Score:5, Funny)

    by nharmon (97591) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:00PM (#35409118) Homepage

    You should have just grabbed the microphone and yelled...

    KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!

  • by BSAtHome (455370)

    He is dead Jim.

  • Considering politicians are trying to kill the space program.

  • Wow (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Lefty2446 (232351) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:04PM (#35409176) Homepage

    That would have been a pretty emotional moment I would think.

    • by ae1294 (1547521)

      That would have been a pretty emotional moment I would think.

      I wonder if they all screamed KIIIIIIIRK! for waking them up

    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      It's hard to get emotional in zero-g. The tears just sort of sit there...

  • by tekrat (242117) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:06PM (#35409212) Homepage Journal

    That William Shatner has, for more than the last decade, made an entire career out of being a parody of himself?

    I think it started with those Priceline commercials where he was singing "I've got two tickets to paradise..", and since then, all he's done is essentially do an SNL skit where William Shatner plays William Shatner hamming it up.

    And only he could get away with it.

    • by Killjoy_NL (719667) <slashdot@remco.p ... minus physicist> on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:10PM (#35409290)

      I love Shatner in Boston Legal, hate him in Shit my dad says, that last show sucks gallons of ass :(

      • Somehow I always thought ass was measured by weight, not by volume. I learned something new today!

      • by vidnet (580068)

        that last show sucks gallons of ass

        For those europeans too lazy to do the math, that's between 2.5 and 4 litres of bum.

    • Boston Legal (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Have you seen Boston Legal?

      He was anything BUT Captain Kirk and I have to say, some of his finest work on TV or movies.

      • by VMSBIGOT (933292)

        Bad example. His clamshell cell phone made the communicator chirp when he opens it, and in a later episode he tells people he used to captain a spaceship:

        Denny Crane: [walking through a crowd of reporters] dennycranelaw.com. Pictures, bios, hobbies. I once captained my own spaceship. Muli-talented.
        http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402711/quotes?qt0401847 [imdb.com]

        I also seem to remember a few quips about his 'other' job, hinting at his work for Priceline. I always got the impression that he was spoofing himself as a runni

    • by EnsilZah (575600)

      And only he could get away with it.
      Well, to be fair there's also Hasselhoff.

      Oh wait, parody is not the same as mockery.

    • by preaction (1526109) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:16PM (#35409402)
      Adam West started doing it earlier. So it's a shouting match you want, eh? Well game on Quahog! AAAAAH! AAAAAH! AAAAH! AAAH AH! I'm beating you!
    • The last decade? Let's go with "more than quarter-century". He was in on the joke, seemingly, before anyone else was: Shatner does Rocket-Man, spoken-word [youtube.com].

      My favorite part about that is how the audience doesn't quite seem to get it.

    • That William Shatner has, for more than the last decade, made an entire career out of being a parody of himself?

      I think it started with those Priceline commercials where he was singing "I've got two tickets to paradise..", and since then, all he's done is essentially do an SNL skit where William Shatner plays William Shatner hamming it up.

      And only he could get away with it.

      Yeah, I was just thinking about that. Except when it came across my mind, it was Adam West. As in the term, "Adam Westing", as it's come to be known in some circles. And how he was doing it while Shatner was still acting like an ass to his former castmates.

      Not that I'm complaining; Shatner really needed to get over himself and stop taking himself so seriously, of course.

    • by GPLDAN (732269)
      I dunno, Charlie Sheen is doing a pretty fucking good job of getting away with it as well...
      • by gstoddart (321705)

        I dunno, Charlie Sheen is doing a pretty fucking good job of getting away with it as well...

        Well, Shatner knows he's poking fun at himself.

        I don't get the impression that Charlie Sheen is actually dialed into the fact that he is, or definitely appears to be, somewhat unhinged of late.

        He really seems to have some mental health issues going on at the moment. Or, he's got a remarkably strange strategy to get himself his next gig.

      • by c6gunner (950153)

        The difference being that Charlie Sheen is actually crazy. Like Tom Cruise, except without the Messiah complex.

        • by mcvos (645701)

          I'm a bit confused. Is it Charlie Sheen or Tom Cruise that doesn't have a messiah complex?

    • SNL skit where William Shatner plays William Shatner hamming it up

      That reminds me of the SNL skit where Eddie Murphy teaches Stevie Wonder to do a Stevie Wonder impression... Can't get to the YouTube link from here, but here's an excerpt from the skit transcript [jt.org]:

      • Richie (Murphy): That’s the worst Stevie Wonder impression I’ve ever seen in my life.
      • Alan (Wonder): [grinning] What’s the matter with it?
      • [The crowd roars with laughter as Stevie grins at Eddie, who breaks down and laughs h
  • by UnknownSoldier (67820) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:06PM (#35409224)

    Oblg. ;-)

    "These have been ... the voyages ... of the space shuttle ... Discovery.
    Her 30-year mission: ... to seek out .. new science, ... to build new ... outposts, ... to bring nations together ... on the final frontier, ... to boldly go ... and do what ... no spacecraft ... has done before."

    • by sycodon (149926)

      What's sad is how NASA bureaucrats butchered up such a classic into. It's unlike the never ending speech they give when the Shuttle launches...

      Liftoff of mission ## with the the first gay, transgendered Muslims proving NASA Administrators are really cool guys and will now maybe get an invite to the Hollywood parties where scantily clad girls will rub up against them, which is the closet most of them get to a female in years, flight!

  • by Stregano (1285764) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:11PM (#35409302)
    Just think of how motivated you would be to go to work in the morning if Shatner gave you a wake up call like this:

    "Work, the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of , to boldy go where no computer programmer has gone before. To seek out new code that would shatter new civilizations."
  • by thewils (463314) on Monday March 07, 2011 @03:14PM (#35409372) Journal

    Then he could have woken them up with "Kirk to Enterprise".

    • by Shimbo (100005)

      Then he could have woken them up with "Kirk to Enterprise".

      ...get your clothes back on.

    • The Enterprise never flew in space. I think it was just a test mock up for gliding.

      • The Enterprise was *meant* to be refitted for spaceflight after atmospheric and landing trials; unfortunately some specs changed while building Columbia, and overhauling Enterprise would've meant a very expensive tear-down and rebuild, so they built Challenger around a test bed frame instead.

  • Have you ever kissed a girl?

  • by corbettw (214229) <corbettw&yahoo,com> on Monday March 07, 2011 @04:24PM (#35410408) Journal

    Shatner should've woken them up by yelling "There's a man on the wing of this space craft!"

  • by Bob_Who (926234) <Bob@who . n et> on Monday March 07, 2011 @04:26PM (#35410436) Homepage Journal
    HAL:...I can sing
    Dave Bowman: Yes, I'd like to hear it, HAL. Sing it for me.
    HAL: It's called "Daisy."

    "Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do. I'm half crazy all for the love of you......"
  • Being in orbit makes you alien enough to get nailed by the Kirkster.

  • No audio/video recording clip of this? I'd love to see/hear it. :)

  • It's worth noting that a massive letter writing campaign organized by Star Trek fans in 1979 convinced NASA to rename the first Space Shuttle, originally the USS Constitution, "USS Enterprise" and the first black female, Dr. Mae Jemison, was inspired to pursue her career after seeing Lieutenant Uhura (Nichelle Nichols) on the original series.

    The influence of Star Trek can be seen everywhere, but polls of NASA engineers have revealed that a good portion of them were motivated toward aerospace careers because

  • Are we sure it was Shatner> Did he try to hit on Nicole Stott?
  • I take it nobody asked Douglas Rain to do the job?

  • by cstacy (534252)

    I think he should have been more like, "Hail fellows, well met!"

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