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Poll Finds 23 Percent of Texans Think Obama is Muslim 562

Posted by samzenpus
from the the-world-is-flat dept.
A University of Texas poll has found that 23 percent of Texans are convinced that Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama is a Muslim. Only 45 percent of the people polled correctly identified Obama as a Protestant Christian. Nationwide, the number of people who believe in the "Secret Muslim Conspiracy" is about the same as those who believe that the moon landing was faked (5-10 percent), which makes the high numbers in Texas unusual.

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Poll Finds 23 Percent of Texans Think Obama is Muslim

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:40PM (#25590067)

    That doesn't make sense.

    -- Proud Texan

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:43PM (#25590091)
      yur bein eliteist with that arthmitic.
    • by onix (990980) on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:52PM (#25590203)
      Texas doesn't make sense.
    • by joggle (594025) on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:52PM (#25590205) Homepage Journal

      Boy, that's easy. Let me count the ways:

      Most people agreed with Greenspan that derivatives shouldn't be regulated. Greenspan himself no longer has that view (and he's a staunch libertarian).

      Most people (in America) thought there were WMDs in Iraq before the invasion.

      Most people opposed the $700 billion bailout. I've yet to find a serious economist or capitalist who believes that no action was a valid alternative--we were a hair away from a complete financial halt in the credit/security market which would have quickly halted our entire economy. But, of course, most people haven't taken basic economic courses (much less advanced ones).

      And so on. This is why we don't live in a pure Democracy but elect our peers to lead the rest of us for a number of years--the majority isn't always right.

      • I've yet to find a serious economist or capitalist who believes that no action was a valid alternative--we were a hair away from a complete financial halt in the credit/security market which would have quickly halted our entire economy. But, of course, most people haven't taken basic economic courses (much less advanced ones).

        What about the entire Austrian school, which holds that government meddling is what caused the crisis and more meddling can only make things worse?

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by joggle (594025)

          That is not a mainstream branch of economics (for a darn good reason). It's for similar reasons that they support that derivatives weren't regulated in the first place.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by AuMatar (183847)

          Quoting the austrian school in serious economic discussions is like quoting creationists or flat-earthers. It's pseudo-science to a degree that real economists are embarrassed by them.

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            Quoting the austrian school in serious economic discussions is like quoting creationists or flat-earthers. It's pseudo-science to a degree that real economists are embarrassed by them.

            The first part of what the say makes sense, but they use that as a springboard to jump to a lot of apparent nonsense. But then, a lot of mainstream economics is also apparently nonsense. Do you have links that would help show why their nonsense is worse that everyone else's nonsense?

          • by Flavio (12072) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:54PM (#25590777)

            Quoting the austrian school in serious economic discussions is like quoting creationists or flat-earthers. It's pseudo-science to a degree that real economists are embarrassed by them.

            Liar. Hayek is one of the best known economists in world history, who won the Nobel Prize for showing how government intervention is responsible for the business cycle. He was a member of the austrian school, and his advisor was Ludwig von Mises, a highly influential austrian school economist. A quick Wikipedia search will reveal many other noteworthy economists aligned with the austrian school.

            You're probably just another dumbass who thinks the free market got us into this mess, when in fact all we've seen in the last 100 years is an interventionist economic policy based on central banking.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Anonymous Coward

              Give me a break. Why is it that any time someone disagrees with someone they call the other person a liar? There is a difference between being wrong and lying you know. This sort of rhetoric is what makes it impossible to have a debate on anything these days. It reminds me of how a child argues.

              • by Flavio (12072) on Friday October 31, 2008 @09:43PM (#25591529)

                Give me a break. Why is it that any time someone disagrees with someone they call the other person a liar? There is a difference between being wrong and lying you know.

                Because his association of austrian economics and flat-earthers was an obvious attempt to deceive. His comment never had an argument based on logic, science or history which could only pass as "wrong", because it wasn't the product of an honest mistake. It was a demonstrably false attempt to ridicule which deserved to be called upon.

                I'm not going to tip toe around this matter just for the sake of being politically correct.

              • by unlametheweak (1102159) on Friday October 31, 2008 @10:42PM (#25591853)

                "It reminds me of how a child argues"

                As a person who used to be a child I strongly disagree. Most children argue nonsensically as do most adults. Being nonsensical is not inherently childlike but is just a part of the human condition. Adults merely have the education to make their nonsensical arguments more elaborate.

        • by Geoffrey.landis (926948) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:13PM (#25590421) Homepage

          What about the entire Austrian school, which holds that government meddling is what caused the crisis and more meddling can only make things worse?

          That answer does not address the question. The question asked for a specific "serious economist or capitalist", not a generic "school."

          Is there a specific person representing this "Austrian school" who is quoted in a reliable source as saying that no action was a valid alternative?

          That means, quoted recently, specificly addressing this crisis; not quotes showing they said years ago "well, in the future when the mortgage default crisis is going to cause a liquidity crisis in the world, our theoretical analysis is going to recommend that no action should be taken."

        • by Billly Gates (198444) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @12:26AM (#25592381) Journal

          The Austrain school of thought which Ron Paul subscribes to studies mathmatical curves of supply and demand and how they should mathmatically balance (when the market is perfect). The problem is market perfection is like a limit in Calculus. You aim for it but its never there. You only get closer and closer to it (for those who do not know what limits are).

          For a perfect market you need to have perfectly rational human beings who are well informed %100 of the time. Also in a perfect market there are no monopolies, no barriers of entry, no perfect substitutes, and eveything is always balanced out where if one person ruins the market another balances to offset any correction so everyone is happy in this perfect capitalist utopia.

          Here is reality:
          - Economists do not take human/consumer behavior courses. Humans like to shop at the same place which is why chains are so popular and they may not always be the most informed or care if one place has what they need for cheaper. I go to Walmart and thats it .. etc.
          - Investors are not rational. That says it all ... and look what they have done?
          - No laws against bad loans and no laws about disclosure of ARMS. Most of the time they are in page 21 of the contract in lawyer speak in very small print and the bank does not mention its an arm. Only WOW 500k for only $1600 a month!!
          - Yes its true taxes due change consumer behavior but what are you going to do? Have a volunteer pay system for the military, damns, bridges, hospitals, etc on all public goods?
          - People try to get ahead sometimes does not balance but rather tilts the economy so either ther corporations, home owners, or banks try to rig the system for maximum profits which destabilized the market rather than balanced it.
          - I do not like what Microsoft and Walmart are doing. I am sure we can just compete agaisnt them and take them down tomorrow right? ... uh no. Monopolies are market failures and are not caused by the government. Barriers of entry are the problem by proprietary software or those who have insane power on suppliers

          So sorry but regulation can be good ... GRASP! . Ronald Reagan may have made it unpopular in the west but the only people who support this system are corporations and investors looking to make a quick buck. Its not socialism or communism to have regulations. People are not rational and do things that harm others and themselves. Normally I like to think if someone is dumb enough to shoot themselves in the foot that is their problem. However, we are all suffering indirectly from what a few irrational people did and that is not fair.

      • by LingNoi (1066278) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:03PM (#25590295)

        So... you're saying that Obama is a muslim?

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by joggle (594025)

          False dichotomy (and missing the intent of the grandparent poster). The grandparent poster was referring to the people that did not believe Obama believe in the religion he claims to believe in.

          While most of the people certainly can be wrong, it doesn't mean the majority is always wrong.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by twistedcubic (577194)

        Most people opposed the $700 billion bailout. I've yet to find a serious economist or capitalist who believes that no action was a valid alternative...
        I heard a couple economists on NPR claim the problem would work itself out, mostly. I don't remember names, sorry. But really, I think you're making a mistake assuming economists are scientists. I think they're more like lawyers-- you can always find one with any given opinion.
    • by Eudial (590661) on Friday October 31, 2008 @08:14PM (#25590947)

      1,000,000 lemmings can't all be wrong.

  • That's OK (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:44PM (#25590107)

    A second poll found that one if four people are complete fucking idiots.

  • by joggle (594025) on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:45PM (#25590115) Homepage Journal

    Texas is a whole 'nother country.

    They have great ice cream (Blue Bell), great water parks (Schlitterbahn), nice lakes and neat caverns. But they also have a lot of insular communities in the country (I grew up in one...not fun if you disagree with the pack/herd).

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      Texas is a whole 'nother country.

      They have great ice cream (Blue Bell), great water parks (Schlitterbahn), nice lakes and neat caverns. But they also have a lot of insular communities in the country (I grew up in one...not fun if you disagree with the pack/herd).

      SCHLITTERBAHN! (Ahem, sorry.)

      And Shiner. You forgot the Shiner Bock!

      And Roller Derby.

      • by joggle (594025)

        I didn't know about Shiner Bock (I moved away from Texas back in '96 and it wasn't big back then).

        And y'all don't have a monopoly on Roller Derby. They play Roller Derby right down the road in Denver every year (fun to watch folks if you haven't seen it before).

      • by Chris Burke (6130) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:23PM (#25590497) Homepage

        SCHLITTERBAHN! (Ahem, sorry.)

        Is it just me, or has this always sounded like a German euphemism for cunnilingus to anyone else?

        And Shiner. You forgot the Shiner Bock!

        Meh. It's okay beer, I guess. The best thing about Shiner is that it's virtually guaranteed to be present at any event in Texas, so I'm never stuck drinking craptacular macro-brewed "American-style lagers".

        And Roller Derby.

        Mmm, Texas Roller Girls.

        Oh, and btw, I'm originally from Michigan. Texas doesn't have any lakes (well I guess it has one). Man-made puddles don't count, even if it is still fun to go out on a buddy's sail boat in one. :P

  • And even if he was (Score:3, Insightful)

    by typidemon (729497) on Friday October 31, 2008 @06:47PM (#25590157)
    What does it matter you bigoted, hateful bastards?
    • woah woah woah (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Stop the judgment bus there buddy!

      I don't like Muslim *ideology*.

      I don't like the idea that I must submit to Allah. Does this make me hateful? A bigot?

      The President has the ability to veto and make decisions, and these in turn affect me, you and the world. What is his or her ideology? Are they pro women's rights? A Muslim, holding to Sharia law, sees women as less-than-human.

      I can't support such an ideology.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        And I'm not big on Christian ideology either. Why should women be quiet in church? Why do I have to marry before having sex? Why should I give 10% of my earnings to the church? Why should I condemn homosexuals and treat them as inferior? etc etc.

        An extremist christian is just as bad as an extremist muslim.

        Fuck them both, I say. I'd rather have someone with intellectual integrity in charge. Someone who refuses to believe in imaginary friends and unprovable teachings. How else am I supposed to trust his judge

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by gardyloo (512791)

        A Muslim, holding to Sharia law, sees women as less-than-human.

        I can't support such an ideology.

        A Christian, holding to the values espoused in the New Testament, sees women similarly.

            Luckily, the FSM has a place for all in his noodly sauce.

        • Re:woah woah woah (Score:5, Insightful)

          by MicktheMech (697533) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:41PM (#25590661) Homepage
          I think you're reading a different New Testament than I am.
      • Re:woah woah woah (Score:5, Insightful)

        by CSMatt (1175471) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:23PM (#25590495)

        "I don't like the idea that I must submit to Allah. Does this make me hateful? A bigot?"

        Which is why the Constitution prohibits a state religion. And at any rate, the President does not legitimately have the power to declare law, only enforce it.

        "The President has the ability to veto and make decisions, and these in turn affect me, you and the world. What is his or her ideology? Are they pro women's rights? A Muslim, holding to Sharia law, sees women as less-than-human."

        Is this much different from the fundamentalist Christain view that women belong in the home (a view that itself is far more moderate compared to what the Bible says about women's rights)? Just like everyone doesn't agree with the Christain fundamentalists yet still claims to believe in the religion, not everyone who labels themselves as Muslim necessarily has the same strict interpretation. Not to mention that if this kind of thing does happen, the President risks losing his or her re-election because of the small amount of Muslims in the country, many of which might not even agree with his or her specific ideology.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by philspear (1142299)

      To play devils advocate (or rather, idiot's advocate, don't want to slander the devil) that WOULD mean he did lie to the american public, he's said many times he's not. It would be a shocking coverup that would really shake my opinion of him, not to mention make people wonder what other ridiculous right-wing lies about him are true.

      So in and of itself, that wouldn't mean anything, and should not be a question. His response would have been. Kind of like clinton: the adultry didn't really matter and should

      • by joggle (594025)

        That's a good devil's/idiot's argument. The only thing I can think of to compare to is people that switch religions. Tony Blair recently switch to Catholicism I believe, but it was after he left office and he implied on a recent interview (I think on the Daily Show) that it would have been a risky thing to politically while in office.

        So hypothetically it should be OK to switch religions I suppose. I know it's weak, but it's all I have for this hypothetical argument.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510)

      What does it matter you bigoted, hateful bastards?

      Hell, his muslim connections are one of the two reasons I like the man for the job. Having muslims in the family (his middle name is Hussein after all) and having lived in a moderate muslim society (indonesia) as a kid, he is one of the few politicians who has significant direct personal experience with muslims and thus I believe he will not participate in the continuing, counter-productive demonization that we've seen since 9/11. While I doubt he can sin

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by couchslug (175151)

      "What does it matter you bigoted, hateful bastards?"

      There is every reason for one who is not a Muslim to oppose Islam, just as they would oppose a toxic secular ideology like Communism. Why should a toxic belief system get a free pass because it is a superstition? Religions may be opposed for perfectly logical reasons such as the societies they produce, their inherent demand for theocracy, etc. Islam does not offer me more personal freedom, does impose social restrictions to which I object, and in practice

    • by peterofoz (1038508) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @02:09AM (#25592823) Homepage Journal

      Because he is born of a Muslim father, the Islamic world community will claim him as a Muslim. If he denies his Islam roots, they will denounce him as a traitor of the worst kind - a deserter of Islam - an apostate; Sharia Law proscribes severe penalties for this. http://www.peacefaq.com/apostacy.html#hatist [peacefaq.com] Find out more about his Muslim roots http://www.danielpipes.org/article/5544 [danielpipes.org]

      All this should not make a difference as to whether or not he is qualified to be the President of the US, but it does feed the phobia Americans have toward a different culture and religion, especially in the light of those who abuse and twist it to their own ends. Would it make a difference if he were Hindi or Buddist or Catholic or Jewish?

      Vote your conscience and make an informed decision based on your candidates voting history. What kind of decisions does he make? Can he make a decision? Can you live with this? Would you trust the 'football' with him.

  • by iamthelinuxguy (656531) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:00PM (#25590269) Homepage
    The tide is turning. I've been a Texan all my life. Conservative talk radio dominates the AM dial and like they say...garbage in...garbage out. I'm constantly amazed how blindly my neighbors follow the party line. Lies and innuendo are accepted as fact. I hate to admit it, but the Christian Conservative movement has turned the whole fight into an us-against-them battle and it's impossible to make rational arguments when it's gotten to that level. There are those of us here that see the absurdity and will be voting for Obama. I don't agree with everything he stands for. Illegal immigration is a huge issue here. We don't really understand why politicians don't stand up for the American worker. Our jobs are being de-valued by workers who come here and will accept a non-living wage for most Americans. Our federal government hands out money hand over fist for welfare, health benefit and education to people that have no legal right to be here. Other than that, I agree with Obama's plans completely. The myth that the market will take care of itself has finally been debunked and hopefully we will get some sane regulation put back in place. I hope we can bring our troops back home and balance the budget. I hope we can do something about health care. I hope we can do something about our reliance on foreign oil. I hope we can help the unfortunate here at home that have slipped through the cracks due to our own selfishness. I believe that Obama is our best hope for a better future...and as a native Texan...he has my vote.
    • by geekoid (135745) <dadinportlandNO@SPAMyahoo.com> on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:34PM (#25590575) Homepage Journal

      Um, illegal immigarants sdo not take jobs away from Americans, in fact they do jobs Americans wont.
      The old ways were the best. The came into the country, they did seasonal work no one else would, and take cash back toMexico where it improved there live and allowed communities to grow to a point where they culd start making things better, which means less immigrants.
      Then Reagan fucked that up pandering to ignorant fears. So now it's a one way trip.

      Two years ago there were whole fields rotting becasue there where no immigrants, and no locals would pick cabbage.
      The farmer was offering 10 - 12 and hour PLUS benefits. Acres just rotted.

      Now you could argue that they shuodl pay for, except farming respond to other fixed factors.

      I wonder what people would do when all there produce started costing 5 times + in price?

      Have you ever picked? I have, for 3 hours and walked away. It's a damn tough job, and anyone who could would find other work for the price.

      Immigrants I have lived near have all been hard working people, doing crap jobs and instilling strong work ethic into their kids so their kids don't have to pick.

      Really, there needs to be a quick to get seasonal Visa for farm workers.

      "Our federal government hands out money hand over fist for welfare, health benefit and education to people that have no legal right to be here."

      No, not really to that degree. Also, people who work here pay taxes on their income. They will never get SS, but they pay into it.

      Besides, since they can't reasonably go back after season anymore, they stay. This wouldn't be an issue if they could go back.

      Add to that the fact that the cost of securing the border would be more then the money immigrants might be getting in services.

      It's not like they come here and take bankers job, or tech jobs.

      Don't even get me started on what it would take to send them all back.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The myth that the market will take care of itself has finally been debunked...

      Keep in mind, the "myth" is that a FREE market would take care of itself. Unfortunately, we haven't had one in recent history, so it hasn't gotten a chance to prove itself.

    • by segedunum (883035) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:44PM (#25590683)
      I feel for you. Man, those Christian fundamentalists have really screwed up conservative values. I'm a Christian myself, and I think we can all agree that some spiritual grounding and much of the stuff in the Bible are good things.

      The problem I have with the Christian Conservatives is they display little in the way of Christian understanding and compassion, and the way they literally interpret the Bible and think they are good Christians scares the shit out of me. Dare I say it, they sound just as bad, if not worse, than the Islamic fundamentalists they rail against.
      • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Friday October 31, 2008 @09:26PM (#25591449)

        Dare I say it, they sound just as bad, if not worse, than the Islamic fundamentalists they rail against.

        It's fundementalism / extremism that is the brain fart, it doesn't really matter what religion or ideology they've latched on to.

        It was an epiphany that came when I realized that people who dig up bad shit in the quran are actively looking for bad shit which they can use to justify hating muslims. They are just the other side of the coin of islamic fundamentalists who dig up the same bad shit in the quran so that they can justify hating non-muslims.

  • by thenewguy001 (1290738) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:03PM (#25590297)
    I dream of the day when an atheist/agnostic person can be elected to the presidency; when a candidate's religious orientation does not matter; when we can truly have separation of church and state.
    • by PhasmatisApparatus (1086395) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:14PM (#25590429)
      Let's see...
      Republican Christians will claim the Athiest is the antichrist.
      Democrat Christians will claim the Athiest is too Fundamentalist(TM).
      Republican Athiests will never get any airtime.
      Conspiracy theorists will still claim he's Muslim. In chain emails.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      I dream of the day when an atheist/agnostic person can be elected to the presidency; when a candidate's religious orientation does not matter; when we can truly have separation of church and state.

      AMEN!..........Oh....wait....shit...

    • by Kandenshi (832555) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:55PM (#25590785)
      I'm a weak atheist [wikipedia.org], but I think that the goal of 'a candidate's religious orientation does not matter' isn't really a desirable one. If someone's religion explicitly commands abhorrant things(eg: kill anyone who wears the colour blue) then we should be rather wary of electing them to office. The religious views of people do influence their thoughts and actions, and those actions can affect me rather directly. Religion itself isn't the issue, rather the type of religion someone belongs to(and the beliefs it advocates) is.

      As well, I'd argue that there have already been atheist/agnostic people as president of the USA. While seperate, many of the founding fathers were at the least deists, believing that God has no influence on the universe, having set it in motion.

      However I agree that someone who went around openly proclaiming they don't believe in God would stand very very little chance of getting elected as president currently.

      After all, atheists are usually really elitist, right? -_- While the movie had some issues, I've long been fond of a quote from senator Gracchus in the film Gladiator.
      "I do not pretend to be a man of the people. But I do try to be a man for the people."
      Why should it be a bad thing for someone to be from the "elite"(whatever that means) as long as they're trying their best to be FOR the people?
    • by aaron alderman (1136207) on Friday October 31, 2008 @10:13PM (#25591683) Homepage
      Australia had an openly atheist Prime Minister in the 80's. (Bob Hawke)
    • by couchslug (175151) on Friday October 31, 2008 @10:51PM (#25591905)

      "when we can truly have separation of church and state."

      Church demands control of state because Deity must rule man (conveniently enough, through his human representatives).

  • No he is not... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Xerolooper (1247258)
    A Muslim no but I will pick the other corporate favorite because of their respective political views not because of any of the mudslinging either way.
  • by russlar (1122455) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:06PM (#25590347)
    Forms Republic of Dumbfuckistan
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by geekoid (135745)

      what's wrong with you, boy? that sound like one of them unamerican mid east locations.

      We ain't gunna do that.

      Signed A .Whole, Proud citizen of Republic of Dumbfuxas

    • by DragonTHC (208439)

      governor of dumbfuckistan can't spell secedes.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Sponge Bath (413667)

      Don't worry. Those of us in Austin will lead the insurgency against the Republicans...
      just as soon as we do a couple of more bong hits.

  • it's the Texans (Score:3, Interesting)

    by nEoN nOoDlE (27594) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:08PM (#25590363) Homepage

    What is the number of people in Texas who believe the moon landing was fake? Some states might have a higher ratio of crazy conspiracy theorists than other states, so I'm just gonna say Texas is one of those states.

  • 23% were unable to find their asses with the aid of a flashlight. On the upside, many holes in the ground were discovered.
  • Truth Revealed (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jekler (626699) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:38PM (#25590631)

    If nothing else, this year's campaigns have shown me how easily manipulated the general public is. It's not just people in Texas, but close friends of mine. I can't even vocalize how shocked I was to have someone I always believed to be an intelligent person confide in me his belief that Barack Obama is a "secret Muslim".

    I can't believe how often and with how much confidence I see pundits, news anchors, editors, and journalists make claims about one candidate and simultaneously brush off exactly the same claim about their favored candidate. I mean to watch Bill Kristol essentially say, with a smile on his face, "It's only socialist if a Democrat does it." or "They're only radical associates if we're talking about Barack Obama." and then brush off the entire conversation the moment Palin's associations are mentioned.

    It makes me think of one of Dr. Phil's favorite phrases "Right Fighters". They don't want to do what works, they want to be right. 95% of the people in this country wouldn't care if the candidate they've chosen blew up the whole fucking world, they'd never admit to being wrong. They'd just smile as their skin boiled off and say "Yeah, well your guy would have been worse."

    I'm ashamed to even participate in this process. I'm ashamed to be saddled with the burden of even having to share a species with Sean Hannity. I don't want the other species of the world to make the mistake of thinking we've got anything in common. More than anything else, I think this election has just made me feel hugely ashamed. It doesn't matter who wins, humanity already lost.

    The political interests now directly control the media. Journalists aren't even reporting or investigating anymore, they work for lobbyists and politicians while pretending to be informing the people. It's sad that comedians like Jon Stewart are so much closer to reporting reality than Fox News or CNN. As I'm sure everyone has now watched, they discussed Marsha Brady on CNN like she's a real person. That's what this whole thing is about. People who can't differentiate between reality and fantasy. Of course so many people believe Obama is a secret Muslim, anyone who thinks the Brady Bunch is a documentary is prone to believe anything.

  • Real question (Score:4, Insightful)

    by SupremoMan (912191) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:50PM (#25590733)
    How many of the 23% think that him being a Muslim would be a problem? There is difference between being uninformed and being a bigot.
  • Yes he is muslim (Score:3, Interesting)

    by tempestdata (457317) on Friday October 31, 2008 @07:58PM (#25590815)

    So what? Last I checked the United States of America was a country with a clear separation of church and state. Why do you CARE if he is a muslim, a christian, a jew , a hindu or an athiest? All you should care about is if he is a good president. Don't give me the hogwash about his religion influencing his actions. Do not vote for a president because he is swayed by his religious beliefs, NOT because he belongs to a particular religion. Don't vote for him even if he is a christian.

    Don't vote for barak obama because he is black either, just as you wouldn't want someone to not vote for him because he is black. Either way its racism. Race, religion and sexual orientation are all irrelevant to his ability to run this country. But no. thats too much work for you isn't it? Its much easier to be ignorant and prejudiced than to be informed and fair.
    Will he be a better president and have better policies than John McCain? That's what you should be thinking about. That's it. NOTHING else. So what if Barak Obama is a Gay, Muslim, Black man? If you think any of those three inherently affects his ability to run this country, then you are ignorant and frankly shouldn't be allowed to vote.

  • by dtjohnson (102237) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @12:37AM (#25592449)

    The only 'religious' thing he's done is attend the Rev. Jeremiah Wright's church for 20 years, who he now disowns for political reasons. Obama's mother was atheist. He never knew his father. His step-father was muslim.

  • by Torodung (31985) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @02:21AM (#25592861) Journal

    There was a great deal of concern that, being Catholic, JFK might take his orders from the Pope, instead of enforcing the Constitution. Until he was elected, it was widely believed that only a Protestant could be elected President.

    It all turned out to be bunk. Kennedy's religion did not dictate his policies, and neither will Barack Obama's.

    The rumor of 'secret Muslim' is untrue, but more importantly, it's already been proven that his religion is irrelevant. Only his ability to "uphold the Constitution" and do what is best for America is important.

    Those who religion is the relevant criterion seek to undermine the Constitution of this country.

    Just read what Mike Hucakbee has to say about it:

    http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/01/15/579265.aspx [msn.com]

    Seriously, our Constitution avoids the mention of God for a freaking reason. The founders had a big problem with the head of the Church of England.

    --
    Toro

  • by argStyopa (232550) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @02:46AM (#25592933) Journal

    He's a member of a bigoted, ethnocentric, racist CHRISTIAN church.

  • by The Famous Druid (89404) on Saturday November 01, 2008 @05:22AM (#25593441)
    23% of the Texas population are morons.

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