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Dog Eats Man's Toe and Saves His Life 207

Posted by samzenpus
from the yes-you-read-that-right dept.
Have you ever been so drunk that you passed out and your dog ate your toe? I haven't either, but luckily for Michigander Jerry Douthett, he has. It turns out Jerry has type 2 diabetes and a wound on his toe had becoming dangerously infected. After a night of drinking Jerry passed out in his chair and the family dog Kiko decided to do a little doggy doctoring. From the article: "'The toe was gone,' said Douthett. 'He ate it. I mean, he must have eaten it, because we couldn't find it anywhere else in the house. I look down, there's blood all over, and my toe is gone.' [Douthett's wife] Rosee, 40, rushed her husband to the hospital where she's a gerontology nurse — Spectrum Health's Blodgett Campus. Kiko had gnawed to a point below the nail-line. When tests revealed an infection to the bone, doctors amputated what was left of the toe."
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Dog Eats Man's Toe and Saves His Life

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  • Hungry dog saves man's life by eating a toe.

    Wow.

    • Re:wow (Score:5, Funny)

      by Chris Tucker (302549) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:38PM (#33140206) Homepage

      Coming up next, on Sick, Sad World!

    • Re:wow (Score:5, Insightful)

      by molnarcs (675885) <molnarcs@gmaiPASCALl.com minus language> on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:56PM (#33140556) Homepage Journal

      Hungry dog saves man's life by eating a toe.

      Wow.

      No, not really. How much do you have to drink to pass out so badly that you don't feel your dog eating your toe?? I mean there could be several more plausible explanations than the one he came up with after waking up from his drunken stupor. At that kind of alcohol abuse, you can bet that the man has no idea what happened before he passed out. Besides, the man is a retard - he was urged to check for diabetes, but resisted "fearing the diagnosis" while his brother died of diabetes complications earlier! And he had this sliver in his toe and tried to remove it with a knife cutting away skin. Then when it got worse and started to both swell and SMELL, his solution was to use loose sandals instead of going to the doctor. Major fail. Oh, and his wife is a certified nurse.

      • Re:wow (Score:5, Insightful)

        by MozeeToby (1163751) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:16PM (#33141010)

        How much do you have to drink to pass out so badly that you don't feel your dog eating your toe?

        How much diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage caused by diabetes) do you need before you can have a severe bone infection without noticing it? It's entirely possible that his toes are completely numb, especially after a night of drinking (which further screws with your blood sugar).

        Besides that, his wife brought him home (you'd think she would have noticed if he were bleeding profusely) and the only blood in the house was on the bed where he was sleeping. I've got to say, their theory doesn't sound as far fetched to me as so many others seem to think it is.

        As for the being too afraid to go to the doctor because you're worried you might be seriously ill... yeah that's retarded. "If I don't put a label on what my bodies doing them I'm not really sick." Yep, brilliant logic.

        • by molnarcs (675885)
          Yeah you're right about the diabetes part, my mistake. As to the dog eating chewing off his toe - I dunno... I'm still a bit skeptical about that, but I admit it might be possible.
      • Re:wow (Score:5, Insightful)

        by interkin3tic (1469267) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:24PM (#33141182)

        How much do you have to drink to pass out so badly that you don't feel your dog eating your toe??

        Maybe not much if the toe is rotting and the nerves are damaged by diabetes and infection.

        Besides, the man is a retard - he was urged to check for diabetes, but resisted "fearing the diagnosis" while his brother died of diabetes complications earlier!

        It's really easy to point to someone acting out of fear and say "That's irrational: that's stupid." All of us have procrastinated out of fear on smaller things than "You could die." It's a universal human failing, and very common when it comes to scary medical things. Yes he should have done many things different, but we don't know the full story.

        Let's reserve terms like "retard" for people who aren't behaving irrationally out of fear for their lives.

        • Re:wow (Score:4, Insightful)

          by mlts (1038732) * on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @03:00PM (#33141748)

          Don't forget that few people have decent health insurance, so it is understandable why some people would put it off, because of fear that it would result in complete loss of coverage, as well as bankruptcy, loss of job. In this economy, one bad injury or illness can get a person's family on the streets.

          This may be one reason why he put it off so long. Regardless, it is tragic.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by oldspewey (1303305)
            They should name the dog HMO.
          • Re:wow (Score:5, Insightful)

            by sjames (1099) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @03:58PM (#33142646) Homepage

            In a hostile environment, hiding illness or injury is a common strategy to avoid predation. In this case, the jackals would be health insurance companies.

            When we prioritize providing decent healthcare over welfare for rich bankers, blowing up brown people and looking under people's clothes in the airport, we'll see less of this sort of thing.

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by DNS-and-BIND (461968)
          Well, we really have to know his political leaning before we can use words like "retard". If he voted the wrong way in the last election, then sure he's a retard. If he voted the correct way, then he's a victim of the imperialist capitalist system.
        • Let's reserve terms like "retard" for people who aren't behaving irrationally out of fear for their lives.

          I reserve the term "retard" for anyone who isn't me.
        • by molnarcs (675885)
          I'd say procrastinating on visiting the doctor in case something might be discovered is understandable to some extent. But doing so when your own brother died of complications of a disease that you also start to have symptoms of... that's stupid.
      • Re:wow (Score:5, Funny)

        by elysiana (1152995) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:28PM (#33141230)

        I can just see that conversation...
        Husband: "Holy cow, where's my toe? What happened?!"
        Wife: "I finally lopped off that death-threat."
        Husband: "What? That... that don't even make SENSE!"
        Wife: "Yep, I've just been waiting for you to pass out drunk so I could take care of it. Smell was gettin' too bad."
        Husband: "But... that ain't even possible! You can't just cut off my toe! Why are you lying?"
        Wife: "*sigh* Okay, you're right, you're right. It was the dog. The dog actually bit it off and ate it. It completely ignored the rancid smell of rotting flesh, and ate your toe."
        Husband: "Oh! Well that makes sense, that dog always was loyal! Good boy! Have some more Jack Daniels, boy!"

      • by doomicon (5310)

        Major Fail? When I was a youngster we would refer to this as "thinning the herd".

      • Re:wow (Score:5, Informative)

        by xigxag (167441) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:42PM (#33141472)

        The reason he didn't feel his dog eating his toe is not just that he was drunk, but because diabetes causes peripheral neuropathy. When you have severe untreated diabetes, you often can't feel pain in your extremities, and untreated sores become gangrenous. So his being drunk was the least of his problems, his bigger problem was that his toe was decomposing and he couldn't feel it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by molnarcs (675885)

          The reason he didn't feel his dog eating his toe is not just that he was drunk, but because diabetes causes peripheral neuropathy. When you have severe untreated diabetes, you often can't feel pain in your extremities, and untreated sores become gangrenous. So his being drunk was the least of his problems, his bigger problem was that his toe was decomposing and he couldn't feel it.

          Yeah, but he could SMELL and see it - that might have been a clue that something's not right...

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        Yup the guy is a loser to begin with. you dont drink like that when you have Diabetes. you also dont ignore injuries when you have that disease either.

        It's just a good example of how redneck we still are here in michigan....

      • by The Jonas (623192)

        No, not really. How much do you have to drink to pass out so badly that you don't feel your dog eating your toe??

        A lot [wikipedia.org]. Link related.

    • Re:wow (Score:5, Funny)

      by Farmer Tim (530755) <(roundfile) (at) (mindless.com)> on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:58PM (#33140608) Journal

      An acquaintance of mine once fell into bed dead drunk, and his pet rabbit chewed the ends of his fingers (it's nae ordinary bunny!). Next day he checked into rehab, which probably saved him from drinking himself to death.

      OK, not quite the same, but what do you expect from a rabbit, an intervention?

      • Nope, but since rabbits were carnivores before being vegans, I'm not surprised. It seems bunnies still have a bit of the old blood lust in 'em.

    • by Snowmit (704081)

      Let them have their moment. This is basically the only time that "dog bites man" will be news.

    • Nowhere in the article does it state that the dog was hungry.

      I don't mean to imply anything, but dogs are used to detect other medical conditions [epilepsy.com].

      • True, but either way.

        • Certainly, there is wow in that story.

          For me:
          1. THE DUDE DIDN'T WAKE UP! Seriously, how drunk do you have to be to sleep through your toe being eaten? Truly, 4 sheets to the wind.

          2. Half the toe is gone, blood is everywhere - how long did he spend looking for it?

          I think it's interesting that he says he wears shoes to bed now.

          I hope he wears a mask, gloves and a codpiece or the dog might just get something more important next time.

          • Diabetic Neuropathy. Look it up. It's entirely possible he had no feeling or almost no feeling in his toes to begin with, before adding drunk to the mix. Not a complication I have to deal with though, at least not yet (I'll get more jumpy about not feeling my feet when I can't discern the texture of the linoleum clearly anymore). I've been pretty lucky so far, my only complication has been swelling that doesn't respond to lasix.

    • Better story:

      "Superman eats man's toe, saves house".

  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <[moc.liamg] [ta] [nhojovadle]> on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:36PM (#33140164) Journal
    As seen on Gladiator and from the US Army Survival Manual (FM 21-76) page 40 [scribd.com]:

    4-97. If you do not have antibiotics and the wound has become severely infected, does not heal, and ordinary debridement is impossible, consider maggot therapy as stated below, despite its hazards:

    *Expose the wound to flies for one day and then cover it.
    *Check daily for maggots.
    *Once maggots develop, keep wound covered but check daily.
    *Remove all maggots when they have cleaned out all dead tissue and before they start on healthy tissue. Increased pain and bright red blood in the wound indicate that the maggots have reached healthy tissue.
    *Flush the wound repeatedly with sterile water or fresh urine to remove the maggots.
    *Check the wound every 4 hours for several days to ensure all maggots have been removed.
    *Bandage the wound and treat it as any other wound. It should heal normally.

    By no means a pleasant option but an interesting way to remove infection.

  • gerentology nurse? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by singingjim1 (1070652) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:41PM (#33140268)
    I'm just wondering how it could have gotten so bad with a nurse in the house?
    • by ceejayoz (567949)

      There are some shitty nurses out there.

      • by H0p313ss (811249) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:01PM (#33140684)

        There are some shitty nurses out there.

        There are shitty husbands out there too. Honestly my wife never knows about my minor medical issues, if she did I'd never hear the end of it. Now I say shitty husbands because deception is a terrible way to deal with problems and I'd probably be better off if nothing was hidden.

        Whats more this guy has diabetes, anyone with diabetes knows to take special care with any kind of wound or infection. He didn't take care of himself, how is that his wife's fault?

    • by confu2000 (245635) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:01PM (#33140678)

      From the article, he had been hiding it from his wife for a while. After she saw it, she suspected diabetes, but he had resisted seeing a doctor due to the fear of a diagnosis. Lots of stupid stuff on his part. Not so many on the wife's.

    • by Pharmboy (216950)

      I'm just wondering how it could have gotten so bad with a nurse in the house?

      Maybe she was trying to let him die to collect the insurance money. Never be worth more dead than you are alive.

  • Moron (Score:4, Funny)

    by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @01:42PM (#33140296) Homepage Journal

    Diabetic and drinking like a fish. Smooth move, retard.
    .
    • Re:Moron (Score:4, Insightful)

      by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:14PM (#33140976) Homepage Journal

      Diabetic and drinking like a fish. Smooth move, retard.

      We were standing in line at the Starbucks one morning behind a woman with a diabetic wrist-band thingie and she ordered a Vente Mocha Frappuccino.

      But then again, I've seen people so fat that they had to ride those little scooter/shopping cart things and it looked like they were buying one of everything in the frozen dessert case.

      If you want to see why the US is headed toward total collapse, go look at the pictures on the "People of Wal-Mart" site.

      • Collapse? It's just natural selection in action.

      • I've seen that site. It is indeed scary.

        I live in the Southeastern US. On a recent trip to Walt Disney World there was a family whose members were literally too large to fit through the turnstiles. To top it off, they complained loudly that the entrances were too small. The children, who appeared to be around 10 or 11 years old, were also obese. I estimate that they weighed about 100 kilos each (220lbs or so). Hey, how other adults live their lives is their own business, and for the most part, how they ra

        • by Rich0 (548339)

          Perhaps, or perhaps it is just genetic. Perhaps that is less likely, but you really can't know for sure. I don't see how ordinary kids could reach those kinds of weights otherwise, unless you strapped them down to a table and pumped food into their digestive systems 24x7.

      • Re:Moron (Score:5, Funny)

        by thesandtiger (819476) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @05:01PM (#33143586)

        Some time ago I saw a person who looked to be about 35-40 years old riding around in a Little Rascal motorized scooter.

        She had a cigarette between her lips, a bottle of soda in a beverage holder, and a couple of donuts on a tray that was right under the steering yoke. I'd say she probably weighed in at 350, minimum.

        I kind of admired her for it... Lots of people *say* "fuck it all" but she was really doing something about it!

        • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

          She had a cigarette between her lips, a bottle of soda in a beverage holder, and a couple of donuts on a tray that was right under the steering yoke.

          Seriously. I used to think the character Krystal from Squidbillies (Early's main "squeeze" and tormentor) was an exaggeration.

          However, if you walk through any Wal-Mart in America today, you will see several Krystals, as well as her bigger, scarier, and less mobile sister.

      • If you want to see why the US is headed toward total collapse, go look at the pictures on the "People of Wal-Mart" site.

        Because people are different? That's a strength.

        Oh, you mean a site dedicated to the ridicule of people who are different by folks riddled with OCD? Yeah, that's a concern.

        • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

          Because people are different? That's a strength.

          Brother, the People of Wal-Mart are a different species.

          Some make Jabba the Hutt look like Angelina Jolie.

    • by blueg3 (192743)

      Going to the hospital for the toe resulted in him being diagnosed with diabetes, at which point he stopped drinking.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by MBGMorden (803437)

        I've never understood the whole bit about being afraid to go to the doctor to get a dianosis. It's not like you don't actually get the disease until the doctor tells you.

        It's similar to girls who won't step on the scale for fear of seeing her weight. It ain't changing, scale or no.

        • by sjames (1099)

          I've never understood the whole bit about being afraid to go to the doctor to get a dianosis. It's not like you don't actually get the disease until the doctor tells you.

          Hoping you can afford health insurance before it gets too serious and knowing "pre-existing" conditions are never covered?

          It's regular every day life for about 1/3rd of the population.

          • by TimSSG (1068536)
            I agree the idea of having a preexisting condition is a reason I am not going to ask my Doctor to test for Cancer. I have health care but not enough for major expenses like Cancer Treatments. So, I rather risk ignorance than know I will die of something I can not afford to treat. Tim S.
        • by selven (1556643)

          In the US, it probably has something to do with diagnoses going on the medical record which all the health insurance companies can see.

  • Here I thought I was reading Slashdot, when all of a sudden I find out that I'm reading Fark.
  • The dog ate my homework. The dog ate my toe. Jeez, man's "best friend" sure takes a lot of crap from us.
  • by Farmer Tim (530755) <(roundfile) (at) (mindless.com)> on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @02:30PM (#33141284) Journal

    ...he didn't have the clap.

  • by stimpleton (732392) on Wednesday August 04, 2010 @03:08PM (#33141864)
    It is technically possible for this to happen, There probably was little feeling in his foot.

    This is what a foot looks like in a diabetic patient (warning - gross) [podiatrytoday.com].

    This is a moderate case. This can occur to the ankles.
  • If a person is diabetic doesn't the doctor advise them not to drink heavily or even drink at all.

    • by canajin56 (660655)
      According to TFA, he refused to see a doctor to confirm diabetes because his brother died from it, and he didn't want to die too. He also didn't see a doctor about a splinter in his toe that got severely infected, swelling and smelling rotten.
  • by joh (27088)

    Really. Good dog, too. Someone give that dog a medal.

  • Before this happened, his friends and family thought he'd never amount to shit.

    .
  • No further elaboration needed...

  • I sure hope the dog didn't get sick.

  • This is a clear case of "dog bites man" and therefore, by definition, not news. Let me know when a diabetic dog's life is saved by his heroic master eating one of his toes.

  • by geekoid (135745)

    Man wakes up without toe. man has dog. clearly the dog ate it.

    More proof that you should have to take a test in logical thinking before your allowed to drink alcohol, drive, vote, edit slahdot, or use a hand gun.

  • I've taken care of a man who had his dog eat not one but two necrotic toes off his feet. Didn't feel a thing - actually, he can't feel anything in his whole foot. Diabetic neuropathy is a bitch.
  • "I can haz toeburger?"

  • Why was a diabetic going out and drinking alcohol, which is nothing but carbs, i.e. sugar?

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