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Music Idle

Couple Sends Record Player Wedding Invitations 64

Posted by samzenpus
from the music-makers dept.
kfogel writes "Karen Sandler (a lawyer at the Software Freedom Law Center) and Mike Tarantino (a professional musician) are getting married in May. They've sent out the coolest wedding invitation ever: a beautifully packaged flexidisc record where the invitation itself is the record player. The song was written by Mike, is performed by Karen and Mike together, and FTW is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. The person who designed the invitations — a friend of the couple's — has blogged about it."

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Couple Sends Record Player Wedding Invitations

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  • by suso (153703) * on Friday April 15, 2011 @09:45AM (#35828600) Homepage Journal

    I think this is an invitation for all of us to crash this wedding.

    • The miniature player is interesting, what I can see of it. In FF4 on linux the gallery stuff doesn't work at all. Probably one would need to enable javascript for some external site, but there are so many (including facebook and twitter js) I didn't bother looking into it, and instead just zoomed the thumbnails. It's a pretty cool little device.
      • by karnal (22275)

        You had me wondering what the hell Final Fantasy 4 on Linux would have anything to do with this article.

    • by tautog (46259)

      I think this is an invitation for all of us to crash this wedding.

      Hmmm... Is there a precedent for /.'ing a physical real-life event??

    • Exactly what I thought. And, also what whores these people are. The couple and the designer!
  • Perhaps (Score:4, Funny)

    by redemtionboy (890616) on Friday April 15, 2011 @09:46AM (#35828608)

    I might get a-round to replying to this one.

  • by gr8_phk (621180) on Friday April 15, 2011 @10:10AM (#35828828)
    Everyone on slashdot under 30 is having a crisis right now, having never seen such a thing. Many under 20 have probably never even heard of a record player.. OMFG how does it make sound without electricity?!?!?! Ahhhhhh.
    • This just seems a little silly. I'd rather get a song on a cheap USB stick.

      I remember when I was a kid taking a pin and attaching it to a paper/styrofoam cup and playing records with it. The sound quality sucked, which is the case with this too.

      Don't get me wrong, I'm not anti vinyl, I still have several hundred vinyl records(none of the ones I destroyed as a kid) and a fairly decent turntable. But this thing is going to make any song sound like it was sung by Mickey Mouse on a 5 day meth & vodka bender

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Splod (40032)

        this thing is going to make any song sound like it was sung by Mickey Mouse on a 5 day meth & vodka bender.

        Way to get the point...

        • this thing is going to make any song sound like it was sung by Mickey Mouse on a 5 day meth & vodka bender.

          Way to get the point...

          I still don't get the point. Please explain it?

          TIA

    • by h4rr4r (612664) on Friday April 15, 2011 @10:20AM (#35828938)

      My record players always used electricity. Sorry grandpa but the handcrank is for chumps and old geezers.

      • by XCondE (615309)
        Even so, a simple one will *still* work without electricity if you spin the record yourself. Plus you mean to tell us you have never seen a gramophone? Not even on TV or a movie?
    • OMFG how does it make sound without electricity?

      You can't explain that.

      -Bill O'Reilly.

    • OMFG how does it make sound without electricity?!?!?!

      It's a miracle. You know, like magnets.

    • by SeaFox (739806)

      This happened just yesterday to me at work. My coworkers were talking about movies they used to watch all the time as kids and the topic of Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf in the fully orchestrated audio recording came up. "Ah, I used to have that on LP when I was little" I said.

      My supervisor said "What's an LP?"

    • Everyone on slashdot under 30 is having a crisis right now, having never seen such a thing. Many under 20 have probably never even heard of a record player.. OMFG how does it make sound without electricity?!?!?! Ahhhhhh.

      The interesting thing is that this isn't necessarily true. In 2010 sales of vinyl records reached their highest level since 1991 [azcentral.com], and grew by 14% last year, while overall industry sales were down 13%. You can buy turntables and LPs in youth-focused places like Urban Outfitters, and club and party DJs are far more likely than 6 or 7 years ago to have actual vinyl on their decks rather than just a couple of CD players and a laptop. An American 20-year-old today is, strangely, more likely to own a turntable

  • Van (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Errol backfiring (1280012) on Friday April 15, 2011 @10:23AM (#35828996) Journal
    I once saw (on TV) a record player that was shaped like a van. You would put the record on a table, and the van would drive over it in circles, playing the record. That was way cool, but I never saw it again...
  • ..but lacks a bit: it gives Rebecca Black some competition in the song department.

  • These were around 30 years ago??? Jerry
    • I remember seing a german paper record player like this one in the eighties. It was voice only and I was amazed. The sound on this one isn't that great. There is an other design with a paper-cone [youtube.com].
    • by cwgmpls (853876)
      You're right. Christian missionaries were using "CardTalk" cardboard record players in the 60s and 70s to distribute recordings of the Bible to areas with no literacy, and no electricity to play conventional recordings. I remember donating money for these as a kid. They are described here http://globalrecordings.net/en/cardtalk [globalrecordings.net] The missionary who came up with the idea states he got the idea from something he saw first in Ireland.
    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      I definitely have seen a fold out cardboard that becomes a record player with it's own record. I don't think it was designed as a mailable invitation or greeting card though, I seem to recall it was a magazine insert.

  • by manitee (2974)

    Like most things, a neat concept and even a clever implementation but the end result (the sound produced by playing the record manually) is jibberish. Before they played the song proper I couldnt even discern what the sound was. But at least you can play the record on a real turntable which, what, 1 in 10,000 households have in 2011.

    Here we go again with people trying to be kewl with this kind of crap. Just send a piece of paper that says date / time / location and spend the extra money on having your re

  • When I was a kid I had one of those cardboard and flexi vinyl 'record players'. It was a 'free gift' from the Tayto crisp company. That was about 35 years ago. Nothing new here except for the troubling increase in people wanting to share their private lives with complete strangers.
  • That will be one cool collector item for those invitees.

  • How are they going to split up all those records after their divorce?

  • It can't be as wonderful as Kip Dynamite signing "Always and Forever" at his wedding. Gosh!

  • This makes me wish I was invited to this wedding. :'(
  • Nice thing about paper record players is that they last a long time. I have one that is 32 years old, and still works.... That means of course that the idea is not really new..... See http://bit.ly/happy1979 [bit.ly] for a recording I made today of this old masterpiece: an audio "Happy New Year" card in 4 languages.

We don't know who it was that discovered water, but we're pretty sure that it wasn't a fish. -- Marshall McLuhan

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