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$1.2 Million Ultimate Games Collection 149

Posted by samzenpus
from the lots-of-free-time dept.
An anonymous reader writes "If you're a collector of video games, counting the complete back catalog of titles for one system as part of your collection is a commendable achievement, but what about having full gaming sets for 22 different systems? I doubt anyone has ever done that through game purchases alone, but one eBay seller is offering such a set. The price? A cool $1.2 million. That's a crazy amount of cash to spend on games, but when you find out what's included in this auction, and the condition the games are in, it might actually sound like a good deal. Here's the list of systems the auction is offering full game sets for along with the number of games for each one:

Nintendo Famicon – 1,050 games
Nintendo Famicon Disk – 200 games
Nintendo Virtual Boy – 19 games
Nintendo Super Famicon – 1,500 games
Nintendo 64 – 200 games
Nintendo DD64 – 10 games
Nintendo Gamecube – 320 games
Sega Master System (Europe) – 300 games
Sega Mark 3 & Master System (Japan) – 80 games
Sega Game Gear – 200 games
Sega Megadrive – 450 games
Sega 32 X – 19 games
Sega Mega CD – 115 games
Sega Saturn – 1,150 games
Sega Dreamcast – 550 games
PC Engine Hucard – 300 games
PC Engine Supergrafx – 6 games
PC Engine CD – 120 games
PC Engine Super CD – 300 games
PC Engine Arcade CD – 12 games
PC-FX – total games not stated
Pioneer Laseractive – total games not listed."
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$1.2 Million Ultimate Games Collection

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 09, 2012 @12:58PM (#40593401)

    Sheesh

    • by ackthpt (218170) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:24PM (#40593821) Homepage Journal

      Tell me about it. The platform I loved the most was the C64. Of course, the Amiga has some rockin' games, too.

      • Tell me about it. The platform I loved the most was the C64. Of course, the Amiga has some rockin' games, too.

        Yep, I had a ton of C64 floppy game disks that had their copy protection cracked thanks to a friend's little computer whiz brother. We never paid for our games then. Archon II, Beachhead I & II, all the arcade games of that era My dream is that one day someone will gather up every game made for all those old systems and put them all in one easy to download MAME file. Or would that be too much to hope for with copyright worries?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by ezakimak (160186)

      no Atari 5200?
      no Atari Jaguar?
      no Colecovision?

      • No Intellivision, either.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by tuffy (10202)

        It's obvious why just by looking at the pictures. The games are almost entirely Japanese, so US systems like Atari aren't represented.

        • by gl4ss (559668)

          It's obvious why just by looking at the pictures. The games are almost entirely Japanese, so US systems like Atari aren't represented.

          even then, where the fuck is neogeo? or is that collection up for 12 million as a separate bid?

          • even then, where the fuck is neogeo? or is that collection up for 12 million as a separate bid?

            From TFS:
            PC Engine Hucard – 300 games
            PC Engine Supergrafx – 6 games
            PC Engine CD – 120 games
            PC Engine Super CD – 300 games
            PC Engine Arcade CD – 12 games
            PC-FX – total games not stated

    • by optimism (2183618) on Monday July 09, 2012 @02:32PM (#40594643)

      How was this not modded up?

      The Atari 2600 games, and the cabinet arcade games of 1978-1983, were the foundation. There is no such thing as an "ultimate games collection" without them.

  • by tuffy (10202) on Monday July 09, 2012 @12:59PM (#40593425) Homepage Journal

    It's over 6,000 different games, many of which have never been opened. No one has enough free time to play them all, so the collecting itself becomes its own reward.

    • by SJHillman (1966756) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:04PM (#40593523)

      6,901 + unstated number of Pioneer Laseractive and PC-FX.

      Let's assume 7,000 in total. If you spent just 30 minutes on each game and played 8 hours a day, every day, it would take approximately 62.5 weeks to play them all.

      • by SomePgmr (2021234) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:47PM (#40594135) Homepage

        Obviously I'll never have that kind of cash, but just a quick look shows some of those single items are like $750 ea, and I'm sure some are more. If 10% of the items are worth something like that, that's already $525,000 on the face of it. That puts the rest around $107 ea.

        For someone that would have to spend years hunting down all that stuff in original factory wrap, and that has that kind of expendable money, maybe it's actually worth it.

        Hard to say... I'll never be that person.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Just like torrenting porn you never watch.

      • People do that ?
      • by Anonymous Coward

        There's always time for porn!

      • by EdIII (1114411)

        Depends on how you watch it.

        Yeah, if you break out a glass of wine and actually watch the whole thing to give a review on the riveting plot twists and depth of the characters... it might take you some time.

        It's like being a tourist or being a Navy Seal that is rapidly inserted into the field of battle to kill them all and let God sort them out later.

        I think most men are probably the latter with porn (we got shit to do man) and have seen pretty much all the good parts that would be put in the movie trailer.

    • by Hatta (162192) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:17PM (#40593693) Journal

      If you want to play classic video games, you're better off buying flash adapters and modchips.

      • I think you misspelled "download emulators and roms".

        USB adaptors are available for many system's controllers if you want accuracy of input.

        • by Hatta (162192)

          No thank you. Emulators are inferior to actual consoles. Get a console, any console, and compare it to an emulator hooked up to the same display with a video switch. You'll see.

      • by LocalH (28506)

        And in the case of the PS2 when it becomes "classic" instead of merely "last-gen", there's always softmods requiring no hardware hacking. Also in existence for the original Xbox and not sure about any other systems as those two are the main ones I'd care about going forward that aren't truly "classic" or even "vintage" at this point, of which those are pretty much already covered with accurate emulators and hardware solutions that also require no hardware hacking.

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      It's over 6,000 different games, many of which have never been opened. No one has enough free time to play them all, so the collecting itself becomes its own reward.

      Considering the quality of some I've seen that list should be pared down considerably to those which are actually playable, rather than some poorly thought out crud (or poorly executed port) which you wouldn't want for free, even if the time spent playing it didn't subtract from your lifespan.

    • And that is different than Pokemon how?

      Actually, if you break it down a lot of time spent in many video game genres is actually just collecting. You have actual collecting quests FPS. You also have collecting a full set of accomplishments (get all secrets in a level to get a gold star for that level) in platform games. RPGs are almost entirely about collecting (collect this great loot, collect completing all these arbitrary missions).

      When you think about it, this guy just took it to another meta-level.

  • Where are the Amiga games?
    • Where are the Amiga games?

      Commodore was a Canadian company. This was an auction of his Japanese related property. RTFA(Read the f'n Auction:-P

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      Where are the Amiga games?

      Most addictive game I played on Amiga was Ralph Reed's BattleMech. Must have spent over 1,000 hours on that game alone.

      Most regretable was Ultima V, which some idiot bypassed the keyboard API and wrote his own keyboard polling routines, which worked like $#!% on the Amiga 2000 - I think my profanity laced phone call to support had a lot to do with that lack of successor, but considering I have a game I heavily anticipated and paid a lot for, I think I was justified.

      • Most addictive game I played on Amiga was Ralph Reed's BattleMech. Must have spent over 1,000 hours on that game alone

        You're not alone :-).

  • .torrent?

    If we ignore, for a moment, the probably-imperfect state of emulation of some of the odder consoles on that list, does anybody have a good ballpark figure for the total size required to contain this collection?
    • Most of them are older games, so even 7,000 games would probably fit on a modest sized thumb drive.

    • Re:Hmmm... (Score:5, Informative)

      by Hatta (162192) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:23PM (#40593797) Journal

      Complete sets for all of these consoles are available through torrents. I have downloaded most of these, and they come in under a terabyte. IIRC, the Dreamcast and PC Engine CD are the largest torrents, each a couple hundred gigs. The cartridge based systems obviously take much less space.

      FWIW, a complete PSX torrent comes out at about 500GB. And that's USA only, with ECM stripped and 7zipped.

      • Complete sets for all of these consoles are available through torrents

        How do you load a Torrent onto an old Nintendo or Sega game box?

        • Re:Hmmm... (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Hatta (162192) on Monday July 09, 2012 @02:48PM (#40594821) Journal

          They sell flash devices now that read the ROM file and present it to the console as if it were a real cartridge. For the NES, the only one around AFAIK is the PowerPak. For the Genesis, your best bet is the Everdrive. For the PCE, there is a card from NeoFlash but I don't recommend it, mine broke. The creator of the Everdrive is rumored to have a PCE card in the works, so I'd wait for that.

          • by Legion303 (97901)

            We had floppy-based systems for SNES and Genesis. About time someone updated that to use flash drives.

    • by Applekid (993327)

      No need to ignore software emulation limitations anymore. There are many devices today that can run games loaded off commodity flash drives, on actual hardware. See: Everdrive, Powerpack, Acekard, and others.

    • by Quila (201335)

      For the Nintendo 64 at least, that's a maximum of 12.8 GB. However, few games actually hit that 64 MB max, and many were down in the single-digit range. So I'd guess no more than 8 GB.

    • by PopeRatzo (965947)

      does anybody have a good ballpark figure for the total size required to contain this collection?

      I would say about half of a shipping container, maybe a little more since they're all in their original packaging.

    • ever heard of romhustler dot net?

      Not as easy as a all-in-one torrent, but they have lots of stuff and nice hosting.

  • Then this is mostly mid-80s to mid 90s technology. Seems like an awesome collection, but... a million dollars!?!? Seems like a lot cooler ways to nerd out for that kind of dough...
  • So, according to wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PC-FX#Software) PC-FX had 62 games and Pioneer Laseractive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneer_LaserActive#Software) had 49 (including region specifics), that means its ~$164 per game. How does that sound like a deal? You could probably scrounge around the internet for 1/4 of that...
    • For the fanatic completionist, it may actually be a good deal. For anybody else, not so much. 60-80% of the games can probably had for peanuts, if they are even worth enough to not have been tossed by now; but there are always some that are damn rare. The difficulty increases, naturally, if you are one of those poor souls haunted by the fact that a mass-produced consumer product's ineffable, virginal, essences escape once the shrinkwrap is removed...
      • Exactly, if you buy this and add it to a complete collection of mint Xbox and PS series then you'll probably find someone who will pay $3m for it in a decade. It's not about games, it's about future interest. Think spending half a million (today's money) on a tulip [wikipedia.org] is outrageous? Not if somebody will pay $600,000 a year later...
        • by PopeRatzo (965947)

          Think spending half a million (today's money) on a tulip [wikipedia.org] is outrageous? Not if somebody will pay $600,000 a year later...

          But if nobody will pay more than $15 a year later, then "outrageous" wouldn't even begin to cover it.

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      You could probably scrounge around the internet for 1/4 of that...

      It saves you the work of doing that 5k times, I guess.

    • by tmosley (996283)
      I think you greatly underestimate the "in original packaging" price multiplier.
    • Well, apart from the fact that many of them are in the original packaging, and many of them are factory sealed (this is a huge boost to price for classics), you can't just take an average. For example, I'm currently selling my game collection (hate to do it, but it must be done before I move). I've got most of my games as complete boxed sets. Zelda A Link to the Past sold for $50, while Chrono Trigger sold for over $400 (and a mint sealed copy will net 7 or 8 grand)! Just looking at an average price per
    • by LocalH (28506)

      You're leaving out the actual systems, and the fact that many of the games are sealed (which is a huge price boost). I'd say that $164 per game on average is a steal, considering the rarity of some of the stuff the guy had.

  • A day late (Score:5, Informative)

    by Dinghy (2233934) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:00PM (#40593471)

    The auction ended Jul 08, 201213:59:58 PDT, so even if you dreamed of getting this collection, it's too late.

  • by alen (225700) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:03PM (#40593509)

    baseball cards, my brother has a bunch of old ones including Mark McGuire rookie. I think he also has barry bonds and some other good rookie cards. dumb middle agers will pay lots of money for paper cards with photos of baseball players

    1980's GI Joe and other action figures. look at ebay prices. dumb middle agers will pay top dollar for toys their parents never bought them

    comic books, the list goes on

    so WTF are you going to do with this stuff? put it in your closet, keep it in "mint" condition, kill anyone who dares to touch it and think how worth it everything was?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      No Neo-Geo I would expect it for that sort of cash.

    • by gman003 (1693318) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:23PM (#40593807)

      so WTF are you going to do with this stuff? put it in your closet, keep it in "mint" condition, kill anyone who dares to touch it and think how worth it everything was?

      Well, if I were to have all those games, I'd open a museum. Buy as many consoles + TVs as possible (old CRTs, if possible, for max realism), pop in as many games as possible. Put up a little placard next to each, describing the history and historical importance of the game. Keep the most popular ones on constantly, but rotate out all the rest. Supplement it with other material - old game magazines, videos, etc. Do some proper archival work as well - have all the games backed up militantly, so the games will never truly be "lost" (maybe do the playing on the duplicated copies, if cost-effective).

      Charge $5 to $25 to come in and play the games all day. Run some special events, maybe have the Minibosses or the Protomen do a promotional concert every so often.

      • by slyrat (1143997)

        so WTF are you going to do with this stuff? put it in your closet, keep it in "mint" condition, kill anyone who dares to touch it and think how worth it everything was?

        Well, if I were to have all those games, I'd open a museum. Buy as many consoles + TVs as possible (old CRTs, if possible, for max realism), pop in as many games as possible. Put up a little placard next to each, describing the history and historical importance of the game. Keep the most popular ones on constantly, but rotate out all the rest. Supplement it with other material - old game magazines, videos, etc. Do some proper archival work as well - have all the games backed up militantly, so the games will never truly be "lost" (maybe do the playing on the duplicated copies, if cost-effective).

        Charge $5 to $25 to come in and play the games all day. Run some special events, maybe have the Minibosses or the Protomen do a promotional concert every so often.

        I actually saw something similar to this in an arcade in Nashville, TN. It was an arcade with a bunch of pinball on the left, older arcade games on the right. In the middle was a large screen tv and a smaller screen tv. They had older systems and a very large shelf of games. You could pay to play by the hour and get to use any of the games in the library.

      • by Crag (18776)

        The Oneups (if they're still playing, last show was over a year ago) and Metroid Metal are also good game-themed bands. Given how popular PAX is, this plan is clearly viable.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      dumb middle agers will pay lots of money for paper cards with photos of baseball players

      dumb middle agers will pay top dollar for toys their parents never bought them

      "Dumb" does not mean "values something more than I do". And yes, that IS what you meant.

    • Apparently you are only looking at the price these are valued at, not what people actually pay for them. Baseball cards and comic books are a great example of something worth something only on paper. Your price guide may list your item X at $300, but there is some asshole, or 10, willing to sell it for $2.
  • by XiaoMing (1574363) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:06PM (#40593549)

    Shipping kills the deal. Red, T/D.

  • by bipbop (1144919) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:08PM (#40593567)
    This is about 6900 games, and $1.2M / 6900 is about $173. Sure, there are probably some valuable games in there. But that price seems very, very excessive for what it is.
    • I think it's low. Dot Hack 1-4 and GU 1-3 for the PS2 all sealed would be worth $500-1000 easy. A ton of Japanese games are worth a fortune in other countries and some whole console + game sets are exclusively japanese in that list. I think there are enough multi-hundred dollar to a thousand dollar games in there to put the average at high-ish but not insane per game.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        I'm not so sure about this. A lot of games that are expensive in the U.S. are dirt cheap in Japan. E.G. ChronoTrigger for the SNES, loose, is worth $65. In Japan, you can find it loose in stores for the Super Famicom around 100-400 yen.

    • At the same time, assembling such a collection is quite a bit of work. Assuming you're a multimillionaire, what is your time worth? And how much time would it take to assemble this collection otherwise?

      • by Nadaka (224565)

        And the purpose of collecting is the hunt.

        This guy probably got every thing he spent his life looking for, and realized that he had nothing left to find.

        To just buy a complete collection whole?

        Kinda pointless.

    • by Bigby (659157)

      You have to account for the price of having the full collection. This is one of those cases where the whole is worth a lot more than the pieces.

      If you had one Ruby Slipper from the original Wizard of Oz movie set, it would be worth some money. But having a full pair is worth SO much more.

    • by p0p0 (1841106)
      A lot of those games are i n the high hundred/low thousands range in cost because of rarity. Not to mention the effort gone to collect and preserve the collection it definitely equals out.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Why?

  • That was the first game system that I bought. But in the end, not very popular.
  • Obligatory eBay link (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anubis IV (1279820) on Monday July 09, 2012 @01:16PM (#40593669)

    Since they forgot to put it in the summary [ebay.com]

    Anyway, the auction already ended with a sale. Also, shipping on it was 1000 euros. Pretty ridiculous, but I suppose it would take quite a few boxes.

    • by chrismcb (983081)
      Seriously? You are complaining about the cost of the shipping?
      He is selling 22 game consoles. Each console probably costs 30 or 40 dollars to ship. That is like $600+ JUST for the consoles, let alone the 6,000 carts. How many carts can you fit in one box? a hundred? or two hundred? At two hundred that is over 30 boxes.
      1000 euros actually sounds like a decent deal. Of course he probably is throwing it on a pallet and shipping it.
      • I wasn't complaining. I was applying an adjective. Besides, if I had the 1M euros to buy that, I doubt I'd be quibbling over 0.1% more for shipping.

  • the Sega Dreamcast w/ 550 games. The best console that never made it hands down.
  • Offered him 500 bucks for it. 1.2 million? He must be joking.
    • Since he got 999,999.99, no he must not be joking. Some of those games are so rare, worth in the 1.5k range. I'm not surprised he got a mil for it. Since he was taking bids, his number must have been right around 1mil and decided to end it and get his cash.

  • Inspect every single one on arrival and place them into a pressure/temperature controlled chamber.

    If these are all in the kinds of condition that would warrant such a high price per piece.... where is the inner geek here?
    We must preserve these, as every good geek knows, you can emulate away, but nothing compares to the solid, mint, original.

    To those that believe this is a rip-off: You now know how to make 1.2 million dollars, good luck hunting!
  • You can't have an ultimate video game collection without Odyssey II.

  • ...in other words, all of them. Wow.

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