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Chevron Gives Residents Near Fracking Explosion Free Pizza 207

Posted by samzenpus
from the are-you-mad-now? dept.
Lasrick writes "Chevron hopes that free soda and pizza can extinguish community anger over a fracking well fire in Dunkard Township, Pennsylvania. From the story: 'The flames that billowed out of the Marcellus Shale natural gas well were so hot they caused a nearby propane truck to explode, and first responders were forced to retreat to avoid injury. The fire burned for four days, and Chevron currently has tanks of water standing by in case it reignites. Of the twenty contractors on the well site, one is still missing, and is presumed dead.' The company gave those who live nearby a certificate for a free pizza and some soda."
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Chevron Gives Residents Near Fracking Explosion Free Pizza

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  • Cold Pizza? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:11PM (#46291307)

    As a bonus, Dunkard Township residence can reheat the pizza with their kitchen faucets

  • by Overzeetop (214511) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:11PM (#46291309) Journal

    [everyone stares at the skinny guy in glasses]

    Skinny guy: What?!? Everybody likes free pizza?

  • What they really needed to go with the pizza bread is a community performance of the Cirque du Solei. Why bother with figurative bread and circuises, when you can get literal ones?
  • by Mr_Wisenheimer (3534031) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:15PM (#46291349)
    . . . that is just part of life, especially something as dangerous as extracting oil or natural gas. When that happens, it only seems reasonable to do something to generate good publicity. However, it is better to do nothing at all (except apologize) than to attempt some insulting gesture. It makes it seem like the residents' exposure to potentially toxic smoke is worth nothing more than a coupon for free pizza. It is insulting. Maybe they should actually pay to send out some doctors or some other meaningful assistance for the residents.
    • by DigiShaman (671371) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:24PM (#46291411) Homepage

      Insulting when it's on the cheap, at least. From a PR perspective, paying off the community in the form of gifts can actually work. Human nature and all that. The correct way of pulling this off is to not be so cheap as to backfire. Perhaps a new XBox or some such for each resident family that would be effected nearby. Take the total cost of the political fallout and divide by family count to get the value that the gift should be.

      Now between you and me, we might feel that a bit condescending. But money talks and we are the minority voice here. It works for politics, no difference here.

    • by Krishnoid (984597)

      It makes it seem like the residents' exposure to potentially toxic smoke is worth nothing more than a coupon for free pizza.

      It is insulting. Maybe they should actually pay to send out some doctors or some other meaningful assistance for the residents.

      Assistance such as, you know, actually sending out the pizza itself.

      • by rubycodez (864176)

        that was floated as trial balloon but unfortunately the local pizzeria was in fact blown up, thus happily limiting costs for the coupon program

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:22PM (#46291395)

    But... if I boycotted every corporation that did something so outrageous as this, I would have no car, no gas to put in it, no clothes to wear, no shoes, nothing to eat or drink nothing to see, hear, or read. we as a people are deeply indebted to evil, and/or depraved assholes. so thank you, you despicable worms... thanks for making our modern world possible.

    • It is a sign that the situation is not being completely ignored. That has some value. Contact has been made and it's a implicit opening for communication instead of just being angry and feeling ignored. Maybe they'll get a lot of people ringing them up saying "you think you can buy me off with a pizza" ranting, and that's the end of it instead of a lot of expensive legal action.
      I can see the point of "we've fucked up, here have a pizza" as being better than silence.
    • by Bite The Pillow (3087109) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @11:56PM (#46292485)

      Fuck you, It's FREE pizza. Get that shit. Nothing to eat? Eat free pizza! It's free, and its pizza!

      And they might give you water instead of soda, so your needs are covered. Shut your piehole, except for the part where you shove pizza pie in it. Like the good lord intended.

    • I buy all my clothes secondhand. I listend to street buskers. I hang out with musicians. I ride my bike. If you wanted, you could buy an electric car and a lot of solar panels, but I get your point. I buy shoes made in the USA. I buy local food. I drink WATER, it falls out of the sky.

      I think you're telling yourself nothing can be done.... so you don't have to do anything. AND you're blaming other people. Bravo. :D

      Get off your ass and change your own life. It's not even that hard.

      • I would add: and avoid "big brand" clothes.

        Seriously - if Calvin Klein wants to use my ass as billboard to advertise his designs he can bloody well pay me rent.

  • by ebno-10db (1459097) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:23PM (#46291401)

    They should have given them hot dogs and marshmallows instead, to roast if it reignites,

  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:26PM (#46291417) Journal
    At the back of the coupon that gets them the free pizza, it is written in very faint lettering, in the same font used to list ingredients in the raman noodle soup, the following, "By redeeming this coupon I hereby forego all claims I have against Chevron and accept the pizza as the full and fair compensation for all the damages that might have been caused to me by Chevron, its associates, its lobbyists, its banksters and/or its legislators, including all damages already caused, all damages that could be caused in the future, in this life, (and in the next seven reincarnations if I am a Hindu or a Buddhist)".

    There lawyers are really really clever.

    • by volkerdi (9854) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:37PM (#46291497)

      They may not even need any fine print. Accepting compensation can affect your right to seek damages later.

      • by Immerman (2627577)

        Somehow I doubt any judge would be impressed by a pizza and soda compensation package for anything beyond a bit of fear and inconvenience though, unless it was a *really* big pizza, or you explicitly agreed to waive rights to further complaints. I suspect even fine print on the back of the coupon would be hard pressed to make the cut.

        • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @10:24PM (#46292121) Journal
          Someone thought no one would take seriously an arrest warrant for failing to return a video to a defunct video store.
          • by Immerman (2627577)

            Touche.

          • by u38cg (607297)
            No, the non-returnee knew nothing of the non-returned video until she was in a jail cell for it.
          • by thegarbz (1787294)

            In most countries of the world contract law provides protection in the form of an expectation in a contract. I.e. I expect not to be able to sign my house away when I sign for a postal delivery.

            It's irrelevant what is written in the fine print. It's irrelevant if I read it and I acknowledge that I read it. In Australia I simply can't sign my house away when accepting a delivery because the contract is void on expectation.

            • You are from Australia. I am from Pennsylvania. Where farmers sold mineral rights to mining companies, thinking, "Let them burrow underground and mine the coal, I will continue to farm on the surface". The courts ruled the mining companies can use any method to get to the "their" coal, including stripping away the top soil, do open cast mining, dump all the excavated tilings all over the property and leave a 20 to 60 feet deep hole where the farm used to be. The farmers are expected to be eternally grateful
      • Unlike most people here, I took a moment to RTFA, and the word "compensation" never appears in it. I get the impression that this was more in the form of a way to thank the residents for staying calm and giving Chevron the time it needed to deal with the situation.
  • Class action (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Macdude (23507) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:30PM (#46291451)

    A Pizza is more than most people get as the result of a class action lawsuit...

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:33PM (#46291465)

    I have to say, in many years I've yet to have a pizza explode - no matter how hard you shake it.

    Just another notch in the belt of Pizza as superior food item.

  • by msobkow (48369) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:42PM (#46291529) Homepage Journal

    Sorry 'bout poisoning your drinking water. Here, have a pizza and STFU.

    • by Mashiki (184564)

      Oh I see we've got someone swallowing tripe again. Let me guess, you also believe that methane only shows up in the water after fracking. And oil never bubbles to the surface to contaminate the ground either.

  • by siphonophore (158996) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @08:43PM (#46291533)

    Chevron has a sizable industrial accident in a community. They take losses in it (insurance likely covers direct losses) and lose a contractor. I'm sure that wherever damages did occur, Chevron is on the hook and is likely paying up. The nearby residents had zero damages and weren't owed a thing. Chevron is not getting off cheap or abdicating responsibility through a pizza giveaway.

    The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

    • by Shavano (2541114)

      When there's a big explosion and fire, there's definitely a possibility that nearby residents were directly affected.

    • Where there is fire, there is smoke. Where there is smoke from an oil well fire, there are carcinogens in the air

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @11:35PM (#46292409)

      Chevron has a sizable industrial accident in a community.

      At least we agree on this. :)

      They take losses in it (insurance likely covers direct losses) and lose a contractor.

      If Chevron was a privately owned little mom-and-pop operation and the "contractor" was their son-in-law I'd have some sympathy. But, in this case, it's hard to imagine that anyone with any real decision making power (that is, responsibility) suffered at all. Somehow I doubt the CEO of Chevron will put a picture of the deceased contractor's family on his desk as a permanent reminder to never let something like this happen again: for a company that size, a few human lives here and there are merely the cost of doing business.

      I'm sure that wherever damages did occur, Chevron is on the hook and is likely paying up.

      With a fire that burned for four days and the loss of life I'm pretty sure that the local government provided some services somewhere along the line.

      The nearby residents had zero damages and weren't owed a thing.

      I have a young nephew who, when he gets mad, runs around swinging his arms randomly hoping to "accidentally" hit someone. I suppose technically there's nothing wrong with his behavior because he's not guaranteed to succeed in hitting anyone and, even if he does, it's not "intentional". But real life isn't quite so simple and black and white: there's also this notion of negligent activity that puts others at risk.

      Chevron is not getting off cheap or abdicating responsibility through a pizza giveaway.

      Last year the CEO of Chevron got about $30 million in compensation [mercurynews.com]. In a standard 2,000 hour work year (50 weeks at 40 hours/week), that works out to $15,000/hour or $250/minute (there was time when I thought lawyers who charged $250/hour had it good). Now, Chevron apparently gave away about 100 pizzas [philly.com] at a cost of $12 or so per pizza - for a total cost of about $1,200. So this pizza give-away is equivalent to just a bit less that 5 minutes of the CEO's time.

      The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

      A better analogy would be that cut down a tree on your property without taking adequate safety precautions and it all goes horribly wrong and falls on a fedex delivery person who was trying to deliver a package to your house and your neigbor tries to give the delivery person CPR but the delivery person dies in your neighbor's arms - not too mention the tree almost fell on your neighbor's house which might have killed your neighbor's family. So you give your neighbor just one single penny to compensate for the distress and risk you caused - and walk away self-righteously feeling that you've given your neighbor far more compensation than your neighbor actually deserved.

    • by jittles (1613415)

      Chevron has a sizable industrial accident in a community. They take losses in it (insurance likely covers direct losses) and lose a contractor. I'm sure that wherever damages did occur, Chevron is on the hook and is likely paying up. The nearby residents had zero damages and weren't owed a thing. Chevron is not getting off cheap or abdicating responsibility through a pizza giveaway.

      The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

      Not that Chevron is off the hook with this pizza, but I was actually impressed that they bought the certificates from a locally owned and operated pizza place and didn't just run out and buy 100 gift cards from Pizza Hut or something. At least they were dumping money into a local business with this ploy.

  • Fuck the media (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I work for a hydrofrac company, and frankly, I'm fed up with the media and their bullshit. The only relationship this incident has to 'fracking' is that, the well was likely stimulated at some point in the near-past. The frac company has come, got 'er done, and gone. They didn't cause the fire, nor have anything to do with it.

    Straight from the goddamn Chevron website:

    Update No. 3: Pennsylvania Incident

    Feb. 11, 2014, 10:50 p.m. EST – At approximately 6:45 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 11, a fire was reported o

    • Re:Fuck the media (Score:4, Insightful)

      by MightyMartian (840721) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @10:28PM (#46292139) Journal

      So if I cut your brake lines, but you don't drive the car for a week, and end up smacking up the car, I'm not to blame.

      • Of course you are.

        But if I service your car perfectly. Leave it in a better state than you brought it to me in, and then you crash it because YOU made a mistake then no I'm not to blame.

        Stimulating the well will not cause a fire. You need an ignition source in an oxygen filled atmosphere. I have no idea what caused this particular incident but it could have been anything from an electrical fault causing a spark, a failure in a relief valve seeing heat build up to flash point or something as stupid as som

      • by u38cg (607297)
        No, but if I sell you a set of tyres than six month later your brake lines fail because you didn't service the car properly, I'm not to blame.
  • by Greyfox (87712) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @09:26PM (#46291809) Homepage Journal
    Is the best kind of pizza. Now if they could just keep my water from exploding, too. In general I like my food and drink to be in the non-exploding category.
  • Explosion-Free Pizza, that is.

    Everyone should get some.

  • by the eric conspiracy (20178) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @09:48PM (#46291933)

    From the pictures of the site Chevron didn't have to give out too many certificates. The area is REALLY sparsely populated.

  • by retroworks (652802) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @10:56PM (#46292269) Homepage Journal
    Riots correlate to food shortages. http://necsi.edu/research/soci... [necsi.edu]
  • What were they thinking?! What's the number one thing that picket lines and rioters and protesters want? Duh, pizza and soda! That's just fueling them!
  • by Tetch (534754) on Wednesday February 19, 2014 @11:50PM (#46292467) Journal

    Yup, don't like fracking - it carries too high a risk of polluting my landscape, and quite likely turning a beautiful view into a rubbish-tip. In the UK, the government has even gone on record [telegraph.co.uk] to say the extracted oil & gas won't reduce anybody's energy bills [theguardian.com]. It will, however, make a shit-load of money for some people who already have too much [youtube.com], and who seem willing to rig [youtube.com] the deck [manchester...news.co.uk] to make sure they get their way.

    Don't like nuclear fission power either - it produces *filthy* dirty waste, that we have no idea what to do with. AFAIK, not a single nuclear power station has yet been decommissioned and cleaned up anywhere in the world - quite a few are mothballed, while an alleged "decommissioning" process achieves almost nothing and stretches endlessly into the future at vast expense to the tax-payer (cos poor little private sector can't take the pain, so public sector has to take that task on, or private sector will take its ball home).

    Both these technologies are amateurish, half-assed, ill-thought-out, poor examples of our abilities at this climactic moment of the 21st century, and I'm embarrassed to be a member of the same species that wants to do this crap. Come on ... we're capable of better than that.

    For some reason, many of my peers in this /. community seem to take umbrage whenever there is any criticism of any industrial process if there is some kind of "technology" aspect to that process. There appears to be a belief that so long as a process makes money and is technological, it must be undertaken, irrespective of the impact on this one uniquely precious planet that we have here. I will continue to try to understand this point of view, but I fear its exponents are blinded by the flashing lights.

    Sigh.

    • by thegarbz (1787294) on Thursday February 20, 2014 @06:14AM (#46293331)

      The problem is that it's not theses companies doing the polluting. It's you. Look in the mirror. No not the bathroom mirror but the side mirror of your car as you stand at the bowser pouring another 55L into your tank and ask yourself where did the previous 55L go? Lie at home in the comfort of a 23degree room at 40% humidity, carefully controlled for your comfort, watching a TV made of precious minerals and manufactured using a dirty process while you're wife has a 4 gas burner stove running in the kitchen cutting up vegetables and exotic herbs imported from far away countries and brought over on a giant ship run on dirty fuel oil.

      Supply and demand. I demand *unlimited* energy, and I'll be dammed if I'm going to pay 4c/kWh more than my neighbour in the interest of being green. If I did that I'd never rise to be king rich bastard of the street.

      As a matter of interest remember how peak oil never happened? Can you draw any link to the lack of peak oil and the sudden interest in fracking, and scraping every last little bit of natural tar from sands within a natural reserve.

      I've seen the big polluter. It's not Chevron, or BP, or Shell. It's not TEPCO, or First Energy Corp.

      It's me.

  • by JWSmythe (446288) <jwsmythe@nOsPaM.jwsmythe.com> on Thursday February 20, 2014 @02:51AM (#46292953) Homepage Journal

        That's a pretty good deal. Cause a huge explosion, (probably) kill someone, and blow up a truck, and pay the town off with a pizza and 2 liter.

        If *I* caused a huge explosion.. no, lets just say a small explosion, like just the propane truck. Say one person caught a tiny piece of shrapnel that was picked out with tweezers and fixed with a band-aid, I'd be in jail for an awful long time.

        That doesn't quite seem fair.

  • by Chrisq (894406) on Thursday February 20, 2014 @04:32AM (#46293115)
    If they shook the soda bottle up just before handing it over and then added some toxic sludge to the Pizza they could call it a "fracking special"
  • Blast-Tossed!
  • I mean c'mon guys, this is Capitalism at it's finest. The people living in the town are to blame.. if they had capitalized on the liquid gold under their feet then no-one else could have. I mean, someone has to get rich out of this don't they? There is no sense of responsibility or ownership of anything anymore.. it's just a 'faceless' corporation making multi-billions of dollars of profit per quarter.. you simply can't expect anyone to actually CARE do you?

    What I think is poetic justice is the fact that

  • ...Is an adequate reward for an eighty-hour work week.

Live within your income, even if you have to borrow to do so. -- Josh Billings

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